Presentation Type

Presentation

Conference Track

Data

Description

Instruction librarians often struggle to gather assessment data that is meaningful to both the library and the institution. The variety of settings in which we teach further complicates our ability to streamline how we analyze assessment data. How can we prove that students learn and can perform the concepts we teach at the reference desk or in a module in our learning management system just as well as they can after a one-shot instruction session in the classroom? Learn how to develop an assessment strategy that is unified across every library instruction moment.

Learning Outcomes

Participants will be able to:

  • Develop program outcomes for an academic library

  • Create lesson plans with assessable activities

  • Assess student learning from face-to-face, online, and reference desk instruction using Google Forms

Rights

© Copyright the author(s)

IN COPYRIGHT:
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

DISCLAIMER:
The purpose of this statement is to help the public understand how this Item may be used. When there is a (non-standard) License or contract that governs re-use of the associated Item, this statement only summarizes the effects of some of its terms. It is not a License, and should not be used to license your Work. To license your own Work, use a License offered at https://creativecommons.org/

Start Date

29-3-2019 10:15 AM

End Date

29-3-2019 11:00 AM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28015

Subjects

Instruction librarians, Academic libraries -- Evaluation, Research libraries -- Evaluation

Share

COinS
 
Mar 29th, 10:15 AM Mar 29th, 11:00 AM

Assessment for Librarians: Online, In the Classroom, and at the Reference Desk

Instruction librarians often struggle to gather assessment data that is meaningful to both the library and the institution. The variety of settings in which we teach further complicates our ability to streamline how we analyze assessment data. How can we prove that students learn and can perform the concepts we teach at the reference desk or in a module in our learning management system just as well as they can after a one-shot instruction session in the classroom? Learn how to develop an assessment strategy that is unified across every library instruction moment.