Date of Award

9-8-1971

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

Digitized archived scanned photocopied typescript. 30 pages,

Subjects

Optical illusions -- Psychological aspects, Vision

DOI

10.15760/etd.1518

Abstract

Current explanations for the Ames Trapezoid Illusion are based upon the the absence of cues: the illusion is said to occur at chance. A review of recent literature showed that: (a) the illusion varies in frequency as a function of target shape (b) that the dominant cue to reduce the frequency of the illusion is the variant in retinal height. Based upon the dominance of this cue a new model was presented. Following this model it was hypothesized that observers viewing partial rotation when the target produces the greatest difference in the retinal height of the ends would determine the true direction more accurately than observers viewing the same target when the differences in the retinal height was least. The results confirmed the hypothesis.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/10496

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