Date of Award

1975

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (50 p.)

Subjects

Subliminal perception

DOI

10.15760/etd.2147

Abstract

Subliminal perception is defined as a process whereby a subject reports no awareness of a visual stimulus, and yet his/her verbal behavior, subjectively experienced as “guesses”, is influenced by the stimulation. Various studies have found evidence for and against subliminal perception using discrimination tasks and subjective judgments. Explanations of subliminal perception include the partial cue hypothesis, the theory of perception of structural differences, and the theory that responses to subliminal stimuli are of a semantic nature.

This study was conducted to determine whether subliminal perception involves a discrimination of structural characteristics or a discrimination of the semantic quality of words prior to specific identification. It was also an attempt to find the relationship between the level of stimulus awareness and the type of response.

Description

A thesis submitted in partial fulfillment of the requirements for the degree of Master of Science in Psychology

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/13352

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