Advisor

John Hellermann

Date of Award

Winter 3-30-2016

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages

Department

Teaching English as a Second Language

Physical Description

1 online resource (vi, 80 pages)

Subjects

Second language acquisition -- Study and teaching (Higher), Augmented reality, Conversation analysis -- Social aspects, Social interaction -- Study and teaching (Higher)

DOI

10.15760/etd.2749

Abstract

Augmented reality, place-based games utilize GPS-enabled maps and mobile media recording devices to shift traditional classroom activities into real-world contexts. AR-games for second language learning is a new field of research, and few studies have examined the kinds of face-to-face interactions players engage in during AR-games. Using intensive, multi-camera video data of English language learners playing an AR-game, ChronoOps, this thesis describes how groups start and stop walking during gameplay. The method used is conversation analysis, and this study draws from theories of embodied and distributed cognition, situated learning, and interactional competence Walking to and from various destinations as a group is an important action for accomplishing the ChronoOps game. Thus, starting and stopping are sites where players orient to the tasks and environment of the game. Results show that starts and stops are projectable and accountable actions comprised of multiple semiotic fields including linguistic, gestural, and embodied practices. Furthermore, starts and stops are contingent on players' orientation to their place within the campus and game destinations, but also their place within the locally constructed nature of the AR-game task organization. These findings have implications for future research theories of learning in SLA and AR-games.

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17041

Share

COinS