Advisor

John H. Wirtz

Date of Award

1978

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Biology

Department

Biology

Physical Description

1 online resource (47 p.)

Subjects

Dwarf mistletoes, Seeds -- Dispersal, Mammals

DOI

10.15760/etd.2839

Abstract

No study has been done in the western United States concerning dispersal of dwarf mistletoe by mammals. At the outset of the study it was determined that the red squirrel, the yellow pine chipmunk (Eutamias amoenus), the northern flying squirrel, and the bushy-tailed wood rat (Neotaoma cinerea), were all potential vectors of seeds. The red squirrel was chosen as the main object of study because it is diurnal and is closely associated with ponderosa pine (Pinus ponderosa), a heavily infected species. The study was undertaken to determine whether small mammals play a significant role in transporting mistletoe seeds to uninfected areas. Understanding their role can be helpful both in further understanding of the biology of dwarf mistletoe and in evaluating current control practices.

Description

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit a request to pdxscholar@pdx.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/17206

Share

COinS