Advisor

Kenneth M. Ames

Date of Award

1989

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Arts (M.A.) in Anthropology

Department

Anthropology

Physical Description

1 online resource (189 p.)

Subjects

Indians of North America -- Food -- Pacific Northwest, Animal remains (Archaeology) -- Pacific Northwest, Excavations (Archaeology) -- Pacific Northwest

DOI

10.15760/etd.5932

Abstract

Long-term human dietary change is a poorly understood aspect of Columbia Plateau prehistory. Faunal assemblages from thirty-four archaeological sites on the Plateau are organized into fifteen aggregate assemblages that are defined spatially and temporally. These assemblages are examined in terms of a focal-diffuse model using ecological measures of diversity, richness and evenness. Variability and patterning in the prehistoric subsistence record is indicated. Major trends in human diet and shifts in subsistence economies are documented and the relationship between subsistence and some initial semi-sedentary adaptations on the Plateau is clarified.

Description

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/23312

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