Advisor

Joan McMahon

Date of Award

1991

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Speech with Emphasis in Speech Pathology

Department

Speech Communication

Physical Description

1 online resource (88 p.)

Subjects

Narration (Rhetoric), Language disorders, Teenagers

DOI

10.15760/etd.6073

Abstract

Classroom teachers frequently refer adolescents to speech language pathologists for language skills evaluations. Many of the traditional evaluation tools of the speech-language pathologist focus on the student's oral language skills. The first indication to the classroom teacher that there may be a language problem, however, is usually from the student's written classwork. Very few written language assessment tools are available which give speech language pathologists information regarding linguistic units which can be viewed as communication acts. This paper focuses on one particular discourse unit - the written narrative. Narratives are a natural form of thought and demonstrate how a person organizes and views the world around them. Narratives can be analyzed from the perspective of their "texts," how the writer links individual sentences together to create a cohesive discourse.

The purpose of this study was to compare the written narratives of language impaired and normal adolescents. Two questions were addressed in this study. First, are there differences in texts between language impaired and normal adolescents? And second, do the written narratives of a personal experience and imaginary event produce different texts in language impaired and normal adolescents?

Description

If you are the rightful copyright holder of this dissertation or thesis and wish to have it removed from the Open Access Collection, please submit a request to pdxscholar@pdx.edu and include clear identification of the work, preferably with URL

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/24250

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