Advisor

Esperanza De La Vega

Date of Award

6-8-2018

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Education (Ed.D.) in Educational Leadership: Curriculum and Instruction

Department

Curriculum & Instruction

Physical Description

1 online resource (vi, 188 pages)

Abstract

Bilingual students are the fastest growing demographic group in U.S. P-12 public schools and offer promise and hope to our increasingly global workforce. However, many bilingual students are lagging behind in school, too many do not complete high school, and their schooling experiences are overshadowed by racial and linguistic segregation, low-academic tracking, and subtractive educational experiences. There is a growing body of literature that recognizes the importance of bilingual and bicultural teachers and leaders who can include students' linguistic, cultural, and community assets in school. This qualitative research study explores the experiences a specialized group of elementary bilingual and bicultural teachers that learned English in U.S. P-12 public schools and currently teach bilingual students in Oregon public schools. Through in-depth interviews and classroom observations, this study amplifies the voices of three bilingual teachers as they offer valuable insight into teaching and learning and contribute to how we can create excellent educational experiences for bilingual students. The findings point to how the interconnected nature of language, culture, and identity impacted these bilingual teachers’ approach to teaching, the power of culturally responsive practices in the classroom, and the promise of building positive relationships and community with students and families.

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