Advisor

Larry R. Martinez

Date of Award

8-21-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (iv, 117 pages)

Abstract

Prior research has demonstrated that CEO behavior influences how people perceive corporations and that CEOs associated with controversy can damage corporate reputations. Research also illustrates that attitudes based on prescribed racial and gender characteristics render Black and female CEOs as incongruent with leadership positions. The purpose of this study is to examine the impact of two different corporate errors as justification factors leading to prejudicial evaluations of leaders with stigmatized identities (e.g., race and gender), with a particular emphasis on the intersection of race and gender on leader- and organization-based evaluations. Participants were randomly assigned to one of 12 corporate conditions ([CEO race: white v. black] x [CEO gender: male v. female] x [Corporate error: no error v. diversity error v. non-diversity error]) and assessed to provide responses via an online experiment. Although results revealed a significant main effect of corporate error on leader and organization perceptions, there was no evidence of an interactive effect of CEO race and gender on leader and organization perceptions. Furthermore, the non-significant interaction of race and gender was not impacted by the context of the corporate error. I discuss theoretical and practical implications, study limitations, and avenues for future research.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/26514

Included in

Psychology Commons

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