Advisor

Lauren Frank

Date of Award

8-30-2018

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Communication

Department

Communication

Physical Description

1 online resource (vi, 63 pages)

Abstract

This study explores the relationship between student judgments of teacher expectations and academic success, student self-concept and academic success, and student judgments of discrimination experiences and academic success. In the winter of 2018, a sample of 176 communication students at a northwestern university completed revised versions of the Teacher Treatment Inventory (TTI) and the Self-Description Questionnaire III (SDQ III), as well as the original Everyday Discrimination Scale (EDS). College-age students found the TTI confusing, and many participants said they did not have a relationship with their college professors. The hypothesis that suggested student judgments of teacher expectations would positively correlate with anticipated course grade was not supported, and no significant differences were found between male and female students' judgments of teacher expectations, as well as no significant differences among students of different races on judgments of teacher expectations. The hypothesis that student self-concept would positively correlate with anticipated course grades was partially supported. While some participants did judge themselves to have experienced forms of discrimination, those discriminatory experiences did not result in a significantly negative correlation with anticipated course grades. Implications for understanding expectancy effects and student self-concept as a pedagogical tool for increasing academic success are discussed.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/26515

Available for download on Friday, August 30, 2019

Included in

Communication Commons

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