Advisor

Ellen A. Skinner

Date of Award

12-18-2019

Document Type

Dissertation

Degree Name

Doctor of Philosophy (Ph.D.) in Applied Psychology

Department

Psychology

Physical Description

1 online resource (ix, 86 pages)

Abstract

The current dissertation includes two related studies designed to examine the combined effects of parent and teacher involvement on the development of adolescents' academic engagement as they transition to middle school. Previous studies have demonstrated the positive, individual effects of parent and teacher warm involvement on adolescents' engagement in school. However, this research is limited in its focus on only one social partner. Adolescent development is embedded within multiple, dynamic systems, necessitating the examination of both parent and teacher influences. The few studies that have examined parents and teachers together suggest that their combined effects are both cumulative (additive) and mediated (one partner exerts its effects via the other partner). However, these studies have largely been cross-sectional in nature, posing limitations with regard to understanding changes in the effects of adult supports and feedback effects of adolescents on their parents and teachers.

To address these limitations and contribute to further research on the combined effects of parent and teacher warm involvement, two longitudinal studies were conducted. Study 1 used dynamic path analyses to frame an examination of the combined influence of parent and teacher warm involvement on the development of adolescents' academic engagement and the reciprocal effects of adolescent engagement on adults' continued involvement across a single school year for 5th, 6th, and 7th grade students. Study 2 utilized mediation path analyses to determine if the combined effects of parent and teacher warm involvement on adolescents' engagement were similarly or differentially explained by an engendered sense of relatedness to others across a single school year for 3rd, 4th, 5th, and 6th grade students. In both studies, evidence was found for the cumulative effects of both parents and teachers on students' academic engagement, along with the reciprocal effects of adolescents on their parents and teachers (Study 1), and the importance of a sense of relatedness as a mediator between warn involvement and engagement (Study 2).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/32599

Included in

Psychology Commons

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