First Advisor

Cynthia-Lou Coleman

Term of Graduation

Spring 2022

Date of Publication

7-11-2022

Document Type

Thesis

Degree Name

Master of Science (M.S.) in Communication

Department

Communication

Language

English

DOI

10.15760/etd.7953

Physical Description

1 online resource (iv, 73 pages)

Abstract

The importance of climate change recognition and need for action cannot be overstated. Climate change has historically been a partisan issue with an almost hyper focus on the (un)certainty of science, the need for action within a particular timeframe, and the cost of tackling the issue. With the contemporary relevance and salience of climate change, this content analysis explores emerging framing patterns in coverage of the Green New Deal and subsequent climate change references within news articles from the New York Times and Wall Street Journal in 2019. Frame typology from O'Neill et al. (2015) is used to explore the framing patterns and inform the coding process. I applied a framing analysis via a directed content analysis and a close reading of collected articles to uncover frames at the article level (Hsieh and Shannon, 2005). 54 articles were analyzed: 46 from the New York Times and 8 from the Wall Street Journal.

Results indicate that the economy, political and ideological divides (both across and within the parties), and settled nature of climate science are at the forefront of coverage and concern. My findings follow previous studies' results but highlight the growing divide within the parties on how to address and tackle climate change and climate policies.

Rights

© 2022 Danielle Elizabeth Duffy

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/38257

Included in

Communication Commons

Share

COinS