Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Great Awakening, Charles Chauncy (1705-1787) -- Influence, United States -- Church history -- To 1775, Charles Chauncy (1705-1787). Seasonable thoughts on the state of religion in New-England -- Criticism and interpretation

Description

The Great Awakening sparked social and religious controversies throughout the thirteen colonies. By 1740, two religious fractions had emerged, the New Lights and the Old Lights. As the Awakening grew in popularity, George Whitefield led gaggles of itinerant preachers and lay exhorters onto the streets, thus destabilizing the traditional parish structure. In a last-ditch effort to combat the growing influence of the New Lights, Charles Chauncy burst on to the scene with Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England (1743). This research examines Seasonable Thoughts and how Chauncy’s book responded to societal pressures and attempted to change the public’s opinion. Chauncy was desperately attempting to hold on to the monopoly of power and social influence that he had earned in his community as a minister. Throughout Seasonable Thoughts, Chauncy’s two objective were to discredit the Great Awakening and to bolster the weakened social hierarchy, thus preserving his status as a minister.

PART OF SESSION 4B. THEOLOGICAL POLITICS:

Comment: Elizabeth M. Swedo, Western Oregon University
Chair: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University

Jonathan R. Hayes, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“After Aidan: Irish Peregrini and English Ethnogenesis from Aldhelm to Boniface”

Chancellor T. Jenniges, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The Significance of Oomoto: Why Imperialization of Japan led to an Alternative Religion”

Shinjin Lee, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
“Religious Language and the American Presidency”

Sydney E. Rue, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Watchman: Charles Chauncy’s Defense of the New England Clerical Establishment during the Great Awakening”

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35239

Included in

History Commons

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

The Watchman: Charles Chauncy’s Defense of the New England Clerical Establishment during the Great Awakening

The Great Awakening sparked social and religious controversies throughout the thirteen colonies. By 1740, two religious fractions had emerged, the New Lights and the Old Lights. As the Awakening grew in popularity, George Whitefield led gaggles of itinerant preachers and lay exhorters onto the streets, thus destabilizing the traditional parish structure. In a last-ditch effort to combat the growing influence of the New Lights, Charles Chauncy burst on to the scene with Seasonable Thoughts on the State of Religion in New England (1743). This research examines Seasonable Thoughts and how Chauncy’s book responded to societal pressures and attempted to change the public’s opinion. Chauncy was desperately attempting to hold on to the monopoly of power and social influence that he had earned in his community as a minister. Throughout Seasonable Thoughts, Chauncy’s two objective were to discredit the Great Awakening and to bolster the weakened social hierarchy, thus preserving his status as a minister.

PART OF SESSION 4B. THEOLOGICAL POLITICS:

Comment: Elizabeth M. Swedo, Western Oregon University
Chair: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University

Jonathan R. Hayes, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“After Aidan: Irish Peregrini and English Ethnogenesis from Aldhelm to Boniface”

Chancellor T. Jenniges, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The Significance of Oomoto: Why Imperialization of Japan led to an Alternative Religion”

Shinjin Lee, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
“Religious Language and the American Presidency”

Sydney E. Rue, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Watchman: Charles Chauncy’s Defense of the New England Clerical Establishment during the Great Awakening”