Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Epidemics -- England -- History, Sweating-sickness, Epidemics -- Prevention and control -- History, Public health -- Europe -- History

Description

Abstract: Sudor Anglicus, or "English Sweating Sickness," was a peculiar disease which afflicted England during the Tudor period. First appearing in the late summer of 1485, Sweating Sickness quickly proved itself to be a terrifying killer. Those who contracted the Sweat were struck ill suddenly, often died within the first twenty-four hours, and suffered from a host of symptoms, the most visible of which being a raging fever and oppressive sweat. Between 1485 and 1551, five major outbreaks of the disease wracked the country, attracting the worried attention of those beyond England. In 1529, those anxieties were realized when a German ship unknowingly carried twelve sick passengers into the city of Hamburg, Germany, introducing the Sweat to Europe. This paper centers on the 1529 continental outbreak of English Sweating Sickness, tracking its path across Europe and exploring the different ways in which mainland Europeans reacted to the disease. Did they follow English precedents in handling the Sweat; or did they develop new policies and remedies? In approaching these questions, I will pay special attention to the German public health system, including a discussion of their city quarantines and medical pamphlets.

PART OF SESSION 4C. SICKNESS AND DEATH:

Comment: Tom Taylor, Seattle University
Chair: Alyson Roy, University of Idaho

Ben Hecko, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Plague and Progress: An Analysis of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron and Reform during the Initial Outbreak of the Black Death”

Anika Esther Martin, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The ‘English Bath’: English Sweating Sickness and the 1529 Continental Outbreak”

Patricia A. McManigal, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The Holodomor: The Trickle-Down effect of Political and Economic Choices”

Brian O’Riley, Eastern Washington University, graduate student
“The Klondike Gold Rush and the Dead Horse Trail”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35247

Included in

History Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

The 'English Bath': English Sweating Sickness and the 1529 Continental Outbreak

Abstract: Sudor Anglicus, or "English Sweating Sickness," was a peculiar disease which afflicted England during the Tudor period. First appearing in the late summer of 1485, Sweating Sickness quickly proved itself to be a terrifying killer. Those who contracted the Sweat were struck ill suddenly, often died within the first twenty-four hours, and suffered from a host of symptoms, the most visible of which being a raging fever and oppressive sweat. Between 1485 and 1551, five major outbreaks of the disease wracked the country, attracting the worried attention of those beyond England. In 1529, those anxieties were realized when a German ship unknowingly carried twelve sick passengers into the city of Hamburg, Germany, introducing the Sweat to Europe. This paper centers on the 1529 continental outbreak of English Sweating Sickness, tracking its path across Europe and exploring the different ways in which mainland Europeans reacted to the disease. Did they follow English precedents in handling the Sweat; or did they develop new policies and remedies? In approaching these questions, I will pay special attention to the German public health system, including a discussion of their city quarantines and medical pamphlets.

PART OF SESSION 4C. SICKNESS AND DEATH:

Comment: Tom Taylor, Seattle University
Chair: Alyson Roy, University of Idaho

Ben Hecko, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Plague and Progress: An Analysis of Giovanni Boccaccio’s Decameron and Reform during the Initial Outbreak of the Black Death”

Anika Esther Martin, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The ‘English Bath’: English Sweating Sickness and the 1529 Continental Outbreak”

Patricia A. McManigal, Boise State University, undergraduate student
“The Holodomor: The Trickle-Down effect of Political and Economic Choices”

Brian O’Riley, Eastern Washington University, graduate student
“The Klondike Gold Rush and the Dead Horse Trail”