Start Date

9-4-2021 9:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2021 10:15 AM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

United Farm Workers Organizing Committee -- History, Grape Strike (Calif. 1965-1970), Cesar Chavez (1927-1993), Boycotts -- California -- History, Human rights advocacy -- United States -- History

Description

In 1962 Cesar Chavez, a Latino civil rights leader for Mexican and Filipino workers, formed the National Workers, a small coalition of poorly paid migrant farmers. Chavez sought to ameliorate the harsh working conditions and wages for grape workers in California’s Kern County. Soon afterwards he merged the National Farm Workers Association with the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee, creating the powerful United Farm Workers’ Union. By using nonviolent tactics, inspired by Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, Chavez sought to reform California labor conditions, forcing the grape growers to sign contracts only with the United farm Workers Union. Beginning in Delano California, Cesar Chavez organized several demonstrations including the Grape Strike of 1965, at the Schenley Grape Company, and later a 400-mile pilgrimage to California’s state capitol, Sacramento. With help from numerous civil rights advocates, including Dolores Huerta and various university students, Cesar Chavez fought for worker’s rights. In my paper I will explore this question: just how effective were the march and the boycott in winning support for the workers and concessions from the owners?

PART OF SESSION 1D. ACTIVISM AND PROTEST:

Comment: Jeff Kyong-McClain, University of Idaho
Chair: Dale E. Soden, Whitworth University

Jesse Du, University of Washington, undergraduate student
“Bad Neighbors: The 1967 Zenrin Student Hall Incident and Transnational Student Radicalism in China and Japan”

Kyle Evers, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Whitworth University’s Response to the Vietnam War: A Historical Record of News”

Ashley M. Lambert, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“Cesar Chavez: The 1965 Grape Boycott and the 400-Mile Pilgrimage”

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35254

Included in

History Commons

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM Apr 9th, 10:15 AM

Cesar Chavez: The 1965 Grape Boycott and the 400-Mile Pilgrimage

In 1962 Cesar Chavez, a Latino civil rights leader for Mexican and Filipino workers, formed the National Workers, a small coalition of poorly paid migrant farmers. Chavez sought to ameliorate the harsh working conditions and wages for grape workers in California’s Kern County. Soon afterwards he merged the National Farm Workers Association with the Agricultural Workers Organizing Committee, creating the powerful United Farm Workers’ Union. By using nonviolent tactics, inspired by Martin Luther King and Rosa Parks, Chavez sought to reform California labor conditions, forcing the grape growers to sign contracts only with the United farm Workers Union. Beginning in Delano California, Cesar Chavez organized several demonstrations including the Grape Strike of 1965, at the Schenley Grape Company, and later a 400-mile pilgrimage to California’s state capitol, Sacramento. With help from numerous civil rights advocates, including Dolores Huerta and various university students, Cesar Chavez fought for worker’s rights. In my paper I will explore this question: just how effective were the march and the boycott in winning support for the workers and concessions from the owners?

PART OF SESSION 1D. ACTIVISM AND PROTEST:

Comment: Jeff Kyong-McClain, University of Idaho
Chair: Dale E. Soden, Whitworth University

Jesse Du, University of Washington, undergraduate student
“Bad Neighbors: The 1967 Zenrin Student Hall Incident and Transnational Student Radicalism in China and Japan”

Kyle Evers, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Whitworth University’s Response to the Vietnam War: A Historical Record of News”

Ashley M. Lambert, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“Cesar Chavez: The 1965 Grape Boycott and the 400-Mile Pilgrimage”