Presenter Information

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University

Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Welsh Borders (England and Wales) -- History, Wales -- History -- 1063-1536, Henry VIII (King of England : 1491-1547) -- Military leadership

Description

The Welsh kingdoms originally retained their independence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, but most Normans given fiefs along the Welsh borders gradually expanded into Wales. The result of this ambition was the Marcher Lordships. Warfare was commonplace and lasted until the last Welsh prince was subdued in 1282. Due to the importance of their defensive roles, Marcher lords received or seized authority generally reserved for the crown elsewhere in the realm. They presided over court cases and had their own law codes, often a mix of Norman and native Welsh law codes. Most Marcher Lords commanded sizeable feudal forces. Effectively semi-independent, Marcher Lords often found themselves at the forefront of baronial rebellions. My paper examines the history of the struggles between the kings of England and their marcher vassals, with an examination of the means by which Henry VIII subdued their power in the sixteenth century, as well as the relationship of the lords and the Welsh.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35255

Included in

History Commons

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords

The Welsh kingdoms originally retained their independence after the Norman conquest of England in 1066, but most Normans given fiefs along the Welsh borders gradually expanded into Wales. The result of this ambition was the Marcher Lordships. Warfare was commonplace and lasted until the last Welsh prince was subdued in 1282. Due to the importance of their defensive roles, Marcher lords received or seized authority generally reserved for the crown elsewhere in the realm. They presided over court cases and had their own law codes, often a mix of Norman and native Welsh law codes. Most Marcher Lords commanded sizeable feudal forces. Effectively semi-independent, Marcher Lords often found themselves at the forefront of baronial rebellions. My paper examines the history of the struggles between the kings of England and their marcher vassals, with an examination of the means by which Henry VIII subdued their power in the sixteenth century, as well as the relationship of the lords and the Welsh.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”