Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

Asian History | History of Religions of Eastern Origins

Subjects

Ōmoto (Religious organization) -- History, Nationalism -- Japan, Nao Deguchi (1836-1918) -- Influence, Imperialism -- Japan -- History -- 19th century, Cults -- Japan -- History

Description

Abstract: In 1852 Admiral Matthew Perry led an American fleet to Japan and persuaded the Japanese to modernize. Fearful of being colonized by the West, like the Chinese, the Japanese moved to westernize their own economy and society. As a result, they outlawed many historic customs. Japan began to westernize their customs and define religion. Three categories were established, religion, non-religion, and superstition. Any ideology or practice that no longer benefited their goals of westernization was deemed superstitious and removed from the narrative. However, these developments met opposition. One such opponent, Ueda Kisaburō, created an alternative religion called Oomoto in 1917. It was one of the fastest growing religions of the time and remains active – albeit smaller – in Japan today. Given the official opposition to Oomoto, why was it so popular, and what does this popularity tell us about Japanese society during the early twentieth century?

PART OF SESSION 4B. THEOLOGICAL POLITICS:

Comment: Elizabeth M. Swedo, Western Oregon University
Chair: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University

Jonathan R. Hayes, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“After Aidan: Irish Peregrini and English Ethnogenesis from Aldhelm to Boniface”

Chancellor T. Jenniges, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The Significance of Oomoto: Why Imperialization of Japan led to an Alternative Religion”

Shinjin Lee, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
“Religious Language and the American Presidency”

Sydney E. Rue, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Watchman: Charles Chauncy’s Defense of the New England Clerical Establishment during the Great Awakening”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35281

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Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

The Significance of Oomoto: Why Imperialization of Japan led to an Alternative Religion

Abstract: In 1852 Admiral Matthew Perry led an American fleet to Japan and persuaded the Japanese to modernize. Fearful of being colonized by the West, like the Chinese, the Japanese moved to westernize their own economy and society. As a result, they outlawed many historic customs. Japan began to westernize their customs and define religion. Three categories were established, religion, non-religion, and superstition. Any ideology or practice that no longer benefited their goals of westernization was deemed superstitious and removed from the narrative. However, these developments met opposition. One such opponent, Ueda Kisaburō, created an alternative religion called Oomoto in 1917. It was one of the fastest growing religions of the time and remains active – albeit smaller – in Japan today. Given the official opposition to Oomoto, why was it so popular, and what does this popularity tell us about Japanese society during the early twentieth century?

PART OF SESSION 4B. THEOLOGICAL POLITICS:

Comment: Elizabeth M. Swedo, Western Oregon University
Chair: J. William T. Youngs, Eastern Washington University

Jonathan R. Hayes, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“After Aidan: Irish Peregrini and English Ethnogenesis from Aldhelm to Boniface”

Chancellor T. Jenniges, Eastern Washington University, undergraduate student
“The Significance of Oomoto: Why Imperialization of Japan led to an Alternative Religion”

Shinjin Lee, Brigham Young University-Idaho, undergraduate student
“Religious Language and the American Presidency”

Sydney E. Rue, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Watchman: Charles Chauncy’s Defense of the New England Clerical Establishment during the Great Awakening”