Start Date

9-4-2021 9:00 AM

End Date

9-4-2021 10:15 AM

Disciplines

United States History

Subjects

Bombings -- New York (State) -- New York -- 1910-1920 -- Political aspects, Terrorism -- New York (State) -- New York -- 1920, Bombings -- New York (State) -- New York -- 1910-1920 -- Press coverage, Domestic terrorism -- United States -- History

Description

Abstract: On September 16, 1920, a bomb would go off in the middle of Wall Street killing forty people and injuring over a hundred more. To this day the perpetrator remains unknown, and in the absence of resolution one might question how the contemporary public reacted to this terrorist attack in the heart of Manhattan. Through an archival examination of newspapers printed in the period after the attack it can be seen how this unsolved mystery would fuel persecution and public hysteria in the ensuing months targeting “suspect” political dissidents and ethnic minorities. From studying newspapers published following the bombing more can be understood about those who wrote and consumed misleading news as well as those whom they would scapegoat in an attempt to placate their own anxieties.

PART OF SESSION 1B. THE POLITICS OF DIVISION:

Comment: Shaun S. Nichols, Boise State University
Chair: Caoimhin De Barra, Gonzaga University

Tyler Durbin, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
“‘They’re Building A Wall’: The Separation Barrier in Palestine/Israel”

Maxwell McPherson, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“Fallout from the Wall Street Bombing”

Isabel Wagner, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“A Side Divided: The Role of Pre-Existing Republican Disunity in the Spanish Civil War”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35280

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Apr 9th, 9:00 AM Apr 9th, 10:15 AM

Fallout from the Wall Street Bombing

Abstract: On September 16, 1920, a bomb would go off in the middle of Wall Street killing forty people and injuring over a hundred more. To this day the perpetrator remains unknown, and in the absence of resolution one might question how the contemporary public reacted to this terrorist attack in the heart of Manhattan. Through an archival examination of newspapers printed in the period after the attack it can be seen how this unsolved mystery would fuel persecution and public hysteria in the ensuing months targeting “suspect” political dissidents and ethnic minorities. From studying newspapers published following the bombing more can be understood about those who wrote and consumed misleading news as well as those whom they would scapegoat in an attempt to placate their own anxieties.

PART OF SESSION 1B. THE POLITICS OF DIVISION:

Comment: Shaun S. Nichols, Boise State University
Chair: Caoimhin De Barra, Gonzaga University

Tyler Durbin, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
“‘They’re Building A Wall’: The Separation Barrier in Palestine/Israel”

Maxwell McPherson, University of Idaho, undergraduate student
“Fallout from the Wall Street Bombing”

Isabel Wagner, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“A Side Divided: The Role of Pre-Existing Republican Disunity in the Spanish Civil War”