Presenter Information

Richard Merrell, Seattle University

Start Date

9-4-2021 1:30 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 2:45 PM

Disciplines

European History

Subjects

Masculinity studies, Mark Ormrod -- Criticism and interpretation, Edward III (King of England : 1312-1377), Richard II (King of England : 1367-1400), Edward (Prince of Wales : 1330-1376), Masculinity -- Europe -- History -- To 1500

Description

Abstract: Masculinity studies owes a great debt to sociologist R. W. Connell, whose ideas on hegemonic masculinity have created a rich and fruitful field of study. The application of masculinity studies in medieval history is a similarly new field, dominated by Marc Ormrod’s broadly focused studies of the times. My paper does two things: it narrows Ormrod’s focus while introducing a new element of inquiry into the intergenerational relationships that reveal learned masculinity and the creation of symbols of power in Medieval England. I will focus on King Edward III; Edward the Black Prince, and King Richard II to examine generational kingship and the impact of constructs of masculinity on portrayals of power during the 14th century in England. I will be attempting to decenter male figures as default subjects of historical narrative, and will be attentive to personality and public displays of kingship and masculinity. To do this, I will examine Herald Chandos’s, Life of the Black Prince (ca. 1376–87) and the Wilton Diptych (Anonymous, 1395–99, London, National Gallery, inv. # NG4451), using qualitative methods of textual and visual analysis. My interpretation rests on feminist, masculinity, and gender theories. My research shows that kingship is not static, that ideas on masculinity change from father to son, as revealed by the Herald Chandos and the anonymous artist of the Wilton Diptych.

PART OF SESSION 3B. FAMILY AND GENDER:

Comment: Marie Stango, Idaho State University
Chair: Jennifer Kerns, Portland State University

Jordan D. Hallmark, Portland State University, graduate student
“Parody, Performance, and Conspiracy in Early Eighteenth-Century France: The Subversive Court of Louise Bénédicte de Bourbon, Daughter-in-Law of the Sun King (1700–1718)”

Richard Merrell, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Kings Have Daddy Issues: Masculinity and Generational Kingship of the Plantagenet Dynasty”

Amanda Mills, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
“Before Menstruation: The Upholding and Downfall of Child Marriage in India”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35279

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Apr 9th, 1:30 PM Apr 9th, 2:45 PM

The Kings Have Daddy Issues: Masculinity and Generational Kingship of the Plantagenet Dynasty

Abstract: Masculinity studies owes a great debt to sociologist R. W. Connell, whose ideas on hegemonic masculinity have created a rich and fruitful field of study. The application of masculinity studies in medieval history is a similarly new field, dominated by Marc Ormrod’s broadly focused studies of the times. My paper does two things: it narrows Ormrod’s focus while introducing a new element of inquiry into the intergenerational relationships that reveal learned masculinity and the creation of symbols of power in Medieval England. I will focus on King Edward III; Edward the Black Prince, and King Richard II to examine generational kingship and the impact of constructs of masculinity on portrayals of power during the 14th century in England. I will be attempting to decenter male figures as default subjects of historical narrative, and will be attentive to personality and public displays of kingship and masculinity. To do this, I will examine Herald Chandos’s, Life of the Black Prince (ca. 1376–87) and the Wilton Diptych (Anonymous, 1395–99, London, National Gallery, inv. # NG4451), using qualitative methods of textual and visual analysis. My interpretation rests on feminist, masculinity, and gender theories. My research shows that kingship is not static, that ideas on masculinity change from father to son, as revealed by the Herald Chandos and the anonymous artist of the Wilton Diptych.

PART OF SESSION 3B. FAMILY AND GENDER:

Comment: Marie Stango, Idaho State University
Chair: Jennifer Kerns, Portland State University

Jordan D. Hallmark, Portland State University, graduate student
“Parody, Performance, and Conspiracy in Early Eighteenth-Century France: The Subversive Court of Louise Bénédicte de Bourbon, Daughter-in-Law of the Sun King (1700–1718)”

Richard Merrell, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Kings Have Daddy Issues: Masculinity and Generational Kingship of the Plantagenet Dynasty”

Amanda Mills, Western Washington University, undergraduate student
“Before Menstruation: The Upholding and Downfall of Child Marriage in India”