Start Date

9-4-2021 1:30 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 2:45 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Ptolemaic dynasty (305-30 B.C.), Law enforcement -- Egypt -- History -- To 1500, Police -- Egypt -- History -- To 1500, Administration of criminal justice (Egyptian law), Egypt -- History -- 332-30 B.C., Militarization of police -- United States -- History, Police administration

Description

Abstract: My research analyzes police reformations that occurred during Reconstruction in the aftermath of the Civil War. In my paper, I focus on the development of post-war police departments in three cities: New York, New Orleans, and Chicago. My argument covers the period spanning from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the end of Reconstruction around 1880. My thesis argues that modern police reformation has been made intensely difficult as a result of the societal and economic role police had before and during Reconstruction. I argue that militarization of police departments across the country arose from the need to stop labor unrest and control minority groups. The systemic racism attributed to modern day police violence is not only a biproduct of the United States’ racist history, it is also a major symptom of the failure of Reconstruction. The ten pages I would like to contribute to the conference will focus on the development of New Orleans’ police force during Reconstruction and point to evidence that shows how White Supremacy was able to infiltrate police departments after the Civil War.

PART OF SESSION 3A. POLICE REFORM:

Comment: Steven Garfinkle, Western Washington University
Chair: Dale Graden, University of Idaho.


Nicholas Pisani, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Cops of the Crescent City: New Orleans and the Origins of Police Racism”

Jack Reuter, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Police Militarization in the US: A Transition from Servants of the People to Armed Authorities”

Ethan C. Siddall, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Descent of Law Enforcement in Ancient Egypt from the Ptolemaic Empire to the Early Roman Empire”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35282

Included in

History Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 1:30 PM Apr 9th, 2:45 PM

The Descent of Law Enforcement in Ancient Egypt from the Ptolemaic Empire to the Early Roman Empire

Abstract: My research analyzes police reformations that occurred during Reconstruction in the aftermath of the Civil War. In my paper, I focus on the development of post-war police departments in three cities: New York, New Orleans, and Chicago. My argument covers the period spanning from the end of the Civil War in 1865 to the end of Reconstruction around 1880. My thesis argues that modern police reformation has been made intensely difficult as a result of the societal and economic role police had before and during Reconstruction. I argue that militarization of police departments across the country arose from the need to stop labor unrest and control minority groups. The systemic racism attributed to modern day police violence is not only a biproduct of the United States’ racist history, it is also a major symptom of the failure of Reconstruction. The ten pages I would like to contribute to the conference will focus on the development of New Orleans’ police force during Reconstruction and point to evidence that shows how White Supremacy was able to infiltrate police departments after the Civil War.

PART OF SESSION 3A. POLICE REFORM:

Comment: Steven Garfinkle, Western Washington University
Chair: Dale Graden, University of Idaho.


Nicholas Pisani, University of Portland, undergraduate student
“Cops of the Crescent City: New Orleans and the Origins of Police Racism”

Jack Reuter, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Police Militarization in the US: A Transition from Servants of the People to Armed Authorities”

Ethan C. Siddall, Portland State University, undergraduate student
“The Descent of Law Enforcement in Ancient Egypt from the Ptolemaic Empire to the Early Roman Empire”