Start Date

9-4-2021 3:15 PM

End Date

9-4-2021 4:50 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Mexico -- History -- Revolution (1910-1920) -- Military aspects, War -- Protection of civilians, War -- Moral and ethical aspects, War victims -- Mexico -- History

Description

Abstract: The concept of total war is typically conceived of as the entirety of a nation’s or other belligerent’s resources and the spheres of non-combatant, civilian-centered life being drawn into the conflict. Total war also includes the methods of warfare being conducted with the intent of exhibiting complete destruction on an enemy’s forces and moral. Although total war in the Mexican Revolution is not typically, if ever, discussed in its historiography, I am arguing that the Mexican Revolution exhibited implementation of total war in its warfare, and therefore should be discussed in its historiography to similar degrees as that of the political and social aspects of the Revolution, which are generally focused on to a much greater degree. The form of total war exhibited in the Mexican Revolution manifests in three primary aspects: extreme, unnecessary violence perpetrated by and against the combatants of a conflict, the failure-either intentional or unintentional-to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in the warfare, and the often-coerced involvement of civilian resources, supplies, and lives in the conflict, resulting in great resource, material, and psychological drain on non-combatants.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”

Rights

Creative Commons License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NoDerivatives 4.0 International License.

In Copyright. URI: http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/ This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35286

Included in

History Commons

Share

COinS
 
Apr 9th, 3:15 PM Apr 9th, 4:50 PM

The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution

Abstract: The concept of total war is typically conceived of as the entirety of a nation’s or other belligerent’s resources and the spheres of non-combatant, civilian-centered life being drawn into the conflict. Total war also includes the methods of warfare being conducted with the intent of exhibiting complete destruction on an enemy’s forces and moral. Although total war in the Mexican Revolution is not typically, if ever, discussed in its historiography, I am arguing that the Mexican Revolution exhibited implementation of total war in its warfare, and therefore should be discussed in its historiography to similar degrees as that of the political and social aspects of the Revolution, which are generally focused on to a much greater degree. The form of total war exhibited in the Mexican Revolution manifests in three primary aspects: extreme, unnecessary violence perpetrated by and against the combatants of a conflict, the failure-either intentional or unintentional-to distinguish between combatants and non-combatants in the warfare, and the often-coerced involvement of civilian resources, supplies, and lives in the conflict, resulting in great resource, material, and psychological drain on non-combatants.

PART OF SESSION 4A. SOCIETY AT WAR:

Comment: Charity Urbanski, University of Washington
Chair: Dane J. Cash, Carroll College

Melina Arciniega, University of Alaska Fairbanks, undergraduate student
“Born and Bred in Blood: The Fall of the Aztec Empire”

Rebecca Devereaux, Whitworth University, undergraduate student
“Charlemagne: Nuancing the Conventional Narrative”

Luke Lambert, Gonzaga University, undergraduate student
“Sicut Regale: An Analysis of the Sovereignty and Rule of the Welsh Marcher Lords”

Craig J. Verniest, Seattle University, undergraduate student
“The Manifestation of Total War in the Mexican Revolution”