Title of Presentation

Study of Physical Literacy and Physical Fitness in School Children

Presenter Information

Natalie T. Pexton, OHSUFollow

Presenter Biography

Natalie is an OHSU MD/MPH Candidate for 2019. She will begin her pediatrics residency in June of 2019 and hopes to further specialize in pediatric cardiology. Her public health interests center around studying the prevention of disease in children through increasing physical activity in elementary schools. Outside of medicine and public health Natalie is an avid rock climber and loves reading and playing with her husband and two year old daughter.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

MPH Epidemiology

Degree

MD/MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Background: Currently there is no standard physical education (P.E.) assessment for tracking students’ progress across the state. As a result, there is little data on the physical literacy and physical fitness of school children which are essential to lifelong physical activity.

Physical Literacy is the confidence, knowledge, and ability to execute fundamental movement skills like hopping, throwing, and kicking.

Cardiorespiratory fitness is a measure of the stamina and capacity to perform aerobic exercise.

Objective: To test the “PlayFun” physical literacy and “Pacer” cardiorespiratory fitness tests with Portland Public School students.

Methods:

Setting: Two Portland Public School district elementary schools selected by district staff.

Participants: 200 total 2nd and 5th grade students.

Measurements: Both assessments will be done with students one at a time in the gym with the researcher during P.E. class-time.

Planned Data Presentation:

We will compare students’ scores in the PlayFun and Pacer tests by age and gender. We will also compare how students score in the five different components of the physical literacy test with the Oregon Standards for Physical Education.

We will also compare the average physical literacy and pacer scores of each grade and gender to examine gender and age-based differences

Importance:

The goal is to have an accurate assessment that is standardized across the state that allows teachers to track the progress of individual students, identify underperforming students and test the impact of new programing on student learning.

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Apr 3rd, 2:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Study of Physical Literacy and Physical Fitness in School Children

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Background: Currently there is no standard physical education (P.E.) assessment for tracking students’ progress across the state. As a result, there is little data on the physical literacy and physical fitness of school children which are essential to lifelong physical activity.

Physical Literacy is the confidence, knowledge, and ability to execute fundamental movement skills like hopping, throwing, and kicking.

Cardiorespiratory fitness is a measure of the stamina and capacity to perform aerobic exercise.

Objective: To test the “PlayFun” physical literacy and “Pacer” cardiorespiratory fitness tests with Portland Public School students.

Methods:

Setting: Two Portland Public School district elementary schools selected by district staff.

Participants: 200 total 2nd and 5th grade students.

Measurements: Both assessments will be done with students one at a time in the gym with the researcher during P.E. class-time.

Planned Data Presentation:

We will compare students’ scores in the PlayFun and Pacer tests by age and gender. We will also compare how students score in the five different components of the physical literacy test with the Oregon Standards for Physical Education.

We will also compare the average physical literacy and pacer scores of each grade and gender to examine gender and age-based differences

Importance:

The goal is to have an accurate assessment that is standardized across the state that allows teachers to track the progress of individual students, identify underperforming students and test the impact of new programing on student learning.