Presenter Biography

Taylor Dodrill is a masters student in the School of Public Health in the Environmental Systems and Human Health track.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Environmental Systems and Human Health

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Ocean warming has expanded the niche of harmful algal blooms (HABs), including HABs previously believed to pose little risk of shellfish contamination in the Pacific Northwest. Monitoring efforts in Washington and California have demonstrated that Dinophysis spp. is a HAB of emerging concern and has been linked to diarrhetic shellfish poisoning events. However, quantitative monitoring for Dinophysis spp. on the Oregon Coast has been limited. This analysis provides a preliminary characterization of risk that Dinophysis spp. poses to shellfish consumers in Oregon. Furthermore, we assess the predator-prey interaction between Dinophysis spp. and its prey, Mesodinium rubrum, to determine whether their relationship can be used as a tool to forecast Dinophysis spp. blooms. Based on data collected in the summer of 2018, Dinophysis spp. poses a low overall risk to shellfish consumers on the Oregon Coast. However, peaks in Dinophysis cell concentration following times of high prey abundance warrant further investigation, especially as ocean temperatures continue to rise. Prediction of HABs would enable timely shellfish management action to prevent HAB-related illness and encourage targeted fishery closures to reduce economic impacts on coastal communities.

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Apr 3rd, 4:00 PM Apr 3rd, 5:00 PM

Monitoring Lesser Known Harmful Algal Blooms on the Oregon Coast

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Ocean warming has expanded the niche of harmful algal blooms (HABs), including HABs previously believed to pose little risk of shellfish contamination in the Pacific Northwest. Monitoring efforts in Washington and California have demonstrated that Dinophysis spp. is a HAB of emerging concern and has been linked to diarrhetic shellfish poisoning events. However, quantitative monitoring for Dinophysis spp. on the Oregon Coast has been limited. This analysis provides a preliminary characterization of risk that Dinophysis spp. poses to shellfish consumers in Oregon. Furthermore, we assess the predator-prey interaction between Dinophysis spp. and its prey, Mesodinium rubrum, to determine whether their relationship can be used as a tool to forecast Dinophysis spp. blooms. Based on data collected in the summer of 2018, Dinophysis spp. poses a low overall risk to shellfish consumers on the Oregon Coast. However, peaks in Dinophysis cell concentration following times of high prey abundance warrant further investigation, especially as ocean temperatures continue to rise. Prediction of HABs would enable timely shellfish management action to prevent HAB-related illness and encourage targeted fishery closures to reduce economic impacts on coastal communities.