Presenter Biography

Originally from San Antonio, TX, I moved to Portland to attend graduate school at the OHSU-PSU School of Public Health. My undergraduate degree is in public health concentrating in epidemiology and disease control. I also have a minor in sociology and biology. After a class focused in environmental health, I decided to pursue a MPH in environmental systems and human health. I have a great interest in infectious diseases of all nature (human, animal, plant, etc.) and am intrigued by the role of the environment in the transmission or prevention of infectious diseases. After achieving my MPH I hope to join the United States Public Health Service, with a long term career goal of working for the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Environmental Systems and Human Health

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a member of the Rhabdoviridae family and causes infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) disease in many salmonid species during the juvenile or “fry” stage of life. IHNV is endemic to Western North America and occurs in the Columbia River Basin, where Steelhead and Chinook salmon are the most abundant IHNV-vulnerable species. IHNV can cause an epidemic in wild or farmed stocks, killing 90-95 percent of the fish it infects. Transmission is currently understood to occur by direct exposure through the gills, and the virus is shed typically from asymptomatic or clinically ill carrier adults at time of spawning via eggs. To this point, control and prevention has been moderately accomplished through efficient biosecurity and sanitation. This means ensuring the waters are virus-free for incubation and rearing at hatcheries, as well as disinfecting fertilized eggs with an iodophor solution and careful surveillance of brood stock. In addition to being a significant life-sustaining source for millions of people, particularly tribal populations in the Pacific Northwest, Pacific salmon is a $3 billion dollar industry that employs thousands. Here, we articulate the need to develop strategies to minimize impacts from IHNV through vaccination and other effective prevention methods.

Comments/Notes

I have never presented with a poster, so it would be a new experience for me. However, I am flexible to present orally or a poster. Thanks!

Share

COinS
 
Apr 3rd, 2:00 PM Apr 3rd, 3:00 PM

Preventing Infectious Hematopoietic Necrosis in Salmonid Fish Along the Columbia River Basin

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Infectious hematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) is a member of the Rhabdoviridae family and causes infectious hematopoietic necrosis (IHN) disease in many salmonid species during the juvenile or “fry” stage of life. IHNV is endemic to Western North America and occurs in the Columbia River Basin, where Steelhead and Chinook salmon are the most abundant IHNV-vulnerable species. IHNV can cause an epidemic in wild or farmed stocks, killing 90-95 percent of the fish it infects. Transmission is currently understood to occur by direct exposure through the gills, and the virus is shed typically from asymptomatic or clinically ill carrier adults at time of spawning via eggs. To this point, control and prevention has been moderately accomplished through efficient biosecurity and sanitation. This means ensuring the waters are virus-free for incubation and rearing at hatcheries, as well as disinfecting fertilized eggs with an iodophor solution and careful surveillance of brood stock. In addition to being a significant life-sustaining source for millions of people, particularly tribal populations in the Pacific Northwest, Pacific salmon is a $3 billion dollar industry that employs thousands. Here, we articulate the need to develop strategies to minimize impacts from IHNV through vaccination and other effective prevention methods.