Presenter Biography

Lily is a National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences Fellow at OHSU, and is currently in the second year of the PhD program at the Department of Medical Informatics and Clinical Epidemiology. She is also a licensed professional counselor and therapist, and practiced for many years as a psychotherapist in the Portland area.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

PhD in Clinical Informatics

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

The objective of this scoping review is to provide an overview of issues affecting the results of studies on the health effects of non-occupational wildfire exposure. Although it is well established that wildfire smoke is harmful to people with chronic respiratory conditions, research on other health impacts have often found inconsistent results or small effect sizes. These results are often misinterpreted to mean that wildfire smoke has a negligible effect on non-respiratory outcomes such as cardiovascular health or mortality. However, what these results actually reflect is the complexity of determining public exposure to wildfire smoke, as well as variations in how researchers have chosen to address the issues raised by these complexities.

Comments/Notes

Either poster or oral presentation is fine.

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Apr 3rd, 5:00 PM Apr 3rd, 6:00 PM

Quantifying the invisible: A literature review and history of research on the health effects of wildfire smoke

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

The objective of this scoping review is to provide an overview of issues affecting the results of studies on the health effects of non-occupational wildfire exposure. Although it is well established that wildfire smoke is harmful to people with chronic respiratory conditions, research on other health impacts have often found inconsistent results or small effect sizes. These results are often misinterpreted to mean that wildfire smoke has a negligible effect on non-respiratory outcomes such as cardiovascular health or mortality. However, what these results actually reflect is the complexity of determining public exposure to wildfire smoke, as well as variations in how researchers have chosen to address the issues raised by these complexities.