Title of Presentation

DOHaD and the Latina Paradox

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

Health Promotion

Degree

MPH

Presentation Type

Poster

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

The Latina Paradox is the observation that Latina mothers in the United States have better than expected birth outcomes despite lower socioeconomic status and higher prevalence of risk factors. The Latina Paradox is particularly prominent among women born in Mexico that immigrate to the U.S. prior to having children. Mexican-born women who give birth in the U. S. experience fewer incidences of low birth weight than White women born in the U. S. Various factors are responsible for the Latina Paradox, including social and cultural support in maternity, traditional diet, and immigration of healthier than average women to the U.S. Within one generation after immigration to the United States, Mexican-American mothers experience inequities in birth weight outcomes. To understand this disparity in birth outcomes, we reviewed current literature related to the Latina Paradox and birth outcomes among Mexican-born women in the U.S. Research related to the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) provides a lens through which we can better understand the Latina Paradox. Our review suggests the disparity in birth outcomes are primarily the result of three major factors related to social determinants of health: the impact of toxic stress associated with acculturation, systematic racism, and drastic changes in diet and social support systems. Further research should focus on understanding how social determinants of health influence birth outcomes and maternal health among Mexican-American women living in the U.S.

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Apr 3rd, 5:00 PM Apr 3rd, 6:00 PM

DOHaD and the Latina Paradox

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 296/8

The Latina Paradox is the observation that Latina mothers in the United States have better than expected birth outcomes despite lower socioeconomic status and higher prevalence of risk factors. The Latina Paradox is particularly prominent among women born in Mexico that immigrate to the U.S. prior to having children. Mexican-born women who give birth in the U. S. experience fewer incidences of low birth weight than White women born in the U. S. Various factors are responsible for the Latina Paradox, including social and cultural support in maternity, traditional diet, and immigration of healthier than average women to the U.S. Within one generation after immigration to the United States, Mexican-American mothers experience inequities in birth weight outcomes. To understand this disparity in birth outcomes, we reviewed current literature related to the Latina Paradox and birth outcomes among Mexican-born women in the U.S. Research related to the developmental origins of health and disease (DOHaD) provides a lens through which we can better understand the Latina Paradox. Our review suggests the disparity in birth outcomes are primarily the result of three major factors related to social determinants of health: the impact of toxic stress associated with acculturation, systematic racism, and drastic changes in diet and social support systems. Further research should focus on understanding how social determinants of health influence birth outcomes and maternal health among Mexican-American women living in the U.S.