Title of Presentation

Occupational exposure to noise and hearing change among US Service members

Presenter Biography

Kelly M Reavis, MPH, MS, CCC-A is a 4th year PhD student of epidemiology in the Oregon Health & Science University-Portland State University School of Public Health. Ms. Reavis is also a clinically certified audiologist with over 15 years of clinical research experience in Veteran hearing health. Her research focuses on disentangling the downstream effects of hearing loss while emphasizing upstream prevention strategies. She has a special interest in ushering in advanced epidemiologic methods to hearing science.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Epidemiology

Degree

PhD

Presentation Type

Presentation

Room Location

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Start Date

April 2019

End Date

April 2019

Abstract

Hearing changes during military service have historically been reported as the proportion of Service members demonstrating significant threshold shifts (STS). However, STS do not capture the magnitude of the hearing change or the frequencies impacted. Determining the amount of hearing change and potential risk factors, including occupational noise exposure, that affect the magnitude of change is important to elucidate the impact of military Service on hearing. We will describe the longitudinal progression of hearing for service members enrolled in the Noise Outcomes In Servicemembers Epidemiology (NOISE) Study with historical cohort audiometric data in the DoD's Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC repository. Linking the NOISE study with the DOEHRS-HC data provides an opportunity to estimate the impact of occupational noise exposures on hearing during service. This is a unique use of the DOEHRS-HC data and is the first analysis of hearing change over time using such data. A linear, mixed-effects model will be employed to analyze the data which allows estimation of the average intercept and rates of change via fixed effects and for individual deviation from the average via estimation of random effects. Estimates of the amount of hearing change by frequency and risk factors that impact the hearing will inform DoD efforts to protect Service members hearing during their military career.

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Apr 3rd, 2:05 PM Apr 3rd, 2:18 PM

Occupational exposure to noise and hearing change among US Service members

Smith Memorial Student Union, Room 294

Hearing changes during military service have historically been reported as the proportion of Service members demonstrating significant threshold shifts (STS). However, STS do not capture the magnitude of the hearing change or the frequencies impacted. Determining the amount of hearing change and potential risk factors, including occupational noise exposure, that affect the magnitude of change is important to elucidate the impact of military Service on hearing. We will describe the longitudinal progression of hearing for service members enrolled in the Noise Outcomes In Servicemembers Epidemiology (NOISE) Study with historical cohort audiometric data in the DoD's Defense Occupational and Environmental Health Readiness System – Hearing Conservation (DOEHRS-HC repository. Linking the NOISE study with the DOEHRS-HC data provides an opportunity to estimate the impact of occupational noise exposures on hearing during service. This is a unique use of the DOEHRS-HC data and is the first analysis of hearing change over time using such data. A linear, mixed-effects model will be employed to analyze the data which allows estimation of the average intercept and rates of change via fixed effects and for individual deviation from the average via estimation of random effects. Estimates of the amount of hearing change by frequency and risk factors that impact the hearing will inform DoD efforts to protect Service members hearing during their military career.