Title of Presentation

Student-Driven Addiction Medicine Curricula to Address a Growing Public Health Crisis

Presenter Biography

Rachel graduated with an MPH in Health Management and Policy from OHSU-PSU School of Public Health in 2019. She is currently a first year medical student at Oregon Health & Science University and is the President of Bridges Collaborative Care Clinic.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Medical Doctorate

Degree

MD

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

7-4-2020 2:22 PM

End Date

7-4-2020 2:27 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33756

Keywords

addiction, education

Abstract

In 2017, 21 million individuals in the United States suffered from a substance use disorder (SUD) involving alcohol or drugs. This is a public health crisis and the American health professional workforce is unprepared to care for patients with SUDs. This problem is due, in part, to the lack of addiction medicine education that healthcare providers receive in school. On average, medical schools offer 12 hours of exposure to this material over four years. We intend to describe best practices for the development and implementation of student-initiated course material in both elective and required curricula. Previous studies have shown that brief educational interventions that teach students crucial addiction medicine concepts can have a lasting impact on the addiction practice of future physicians.

To address the lack of addiction medicine education in medical school, students at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), University of California - San Francisco (UCSF), and University of Washington (UW) created and implemented addiction medicine curricula. We hypothesize that the implementation of student-led addiction content for undergraduate medical learners will be both feasible and acceptable. This will be done through enrollment and attendance and assessing changes in student self-assessment of SUD knowledge and attitudes. This will hopefully elucidate the role of student-led curricular development in addressing public health crises.

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Apr 7th, 2:22 PM Apr 7th, 2:27 PM

Student-Driven Addiction Medicine Curricula to Address a Growing Public Health Crisis

In 2017, 21 million individuals in the United States suffered from a substance use disorder (SUD) involving alcohol or drugs. This is a public health crisis and the American health professional workforce is unprepared to care for patients with SUDs. This problem is due, in part, to the lack of addiction medicine education that healthcare providers receive in school. On average, medical schools offer 12 hours of exposure to this material over four years. We intend to describe best practices for the development and implementation of student-initiated course material in both elective and required curricula. Previous studies have shown that brief educational interventions that teach students crucial addiction medicine concepts can have a lasting impact on the addiction practice of future physicians.

To address the lack of addiction medicine education in medical school, students at Oregon Health & Science University (OHSU), University of California - San Francisco (UCSF), and University of Washington (UW) created and implemented addiction medicine curricula. We hypothesize that the implementation of student-led addiction content for undergraduate medical learners will be both feasible and acceptable. This will be done through enrollment and attendance and assessing changes in student self-assessment of SUD knowledge and attitudes. This will hopefully elucidate the role of student-led curricular development in addressing public health crises.