Presenter Biography

Sara Diaz-Anaya is a 3rd year student pursuing a major in Public Health Studies: Community Health Promotion and a certificate in Latin American Studies. Currently, Sara is a research assistant for Dr. Blair Darney at OHSU from the Department of OB/GYN, Family Planning Section. With the support and collaboration from colleagues, she is in the early stages of developing a study to try and determine if and how acculturation affects the reproductive autonomy of Oregon Latinas. In the future Sara hopes to get a Master of Public Health Promotion or a MAS in Transborder Studies. Her main goal is to work towards reducing health disparities and finding solutions to public health challenges, with a focus on the Latinx population.

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

Public Health: Community Health Promotion

Degree

BS

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

8-4-2021 1:55 PM

End Date

8-4-2021 2:06 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35588

Keywords

1. Acculturation 2. Reproductive Autonomy 3. Contraception 4. Unintended Pregnancy 5. Latina Health 6. Immigration 7. Mexican American 8. SASH (Short Acculturation Scale for Hispanics) 9. Reproductive Autonomy Scale

Abstract

Authors: Sara Diaz-Anaya, Edlyn Lopez, & Blair Darney PhD, MPH.

Title

Examining the Link Between Acculturation and Reproductive Autonomy Among Oregon Latinas: Work in progress

Background

Reproductive autonomy is defined as the power a woman has over matters such as pregnancy, childbearing, and contraceptive use and is essential to human rights. Acculturation, or how much of the values, practices, and norms of a host culture an immigrant has adopted, may influence reproductive autonomy. The purpose of this study is to test whether acculturation is associated with reproductive autonomy among Oregon Latinas. We hypothesize that highly acculturated women will report more reproductive autonomy compared to bicultural and low acculturation groups.

Methods

This is a cross sectional study in collaboration with the General Consulate of Mexico. We developed a 25-item survey that includes validated acculturation and reproductive autonomy scales, as well as sociodemographic information. We will be recruiting Latina women ages 15-49 at the Mexican Consulate. We anticipate data collection the summer of 2021. We will use descriptive and multivariable statistics to describe our sample and test the association of acculturation and reproductive autonomy scores.

Results

The study results will be disseminated with the Consulate of Mexico and other local partners to inform them about the concepts of reproductive autonomy and acculturation, and to inform outreach efforts to the Latino(a) community.

Public Health Significance

Understanding whether there is a link between acculturation and reproductive autonomy in Oregon Latinas could help target education and reproductive health and related social services (such as interpersonal violence) services to those who need them most and help support Latinas to achieve their reproductive goals and enhance human rights.

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Apr 8th, 1:55 PM Apr 8th, 2:06 PM

Examining the Link Between Acculturation and Reproductive Autonomy Among Oregon Latinas: Work in progress

Authors: Sara Diaz-Anaya, Edlyn Lopez, & Blair Darney PhD, MPH.

Title

Examining the Link Between Acculturation and Reproductive Autonomy Among Oregon Latinas: Work in progress

Background

Reproductive autonomy is defined as the power a woman has over matters such as pregnancy, childbearing, and contraceptive use and is essential to human rights. Acculturation, or how much of the values, practices, and norms of a host culture an immigrant has adopted, may influence reproductive autonomy. The purpose of this study is to test whether acculturation is associated with reproductive autonomy among Oregon Latinas. We hypothesize that highly acculturated women will report more reproductive autonomy compared to bicultural and low acculturation groups.

Methods

This is a cross sectional study in collaboration with the General Consulate of Mexico. We developed a 25-item survey that includes validated acculturation and reproductive autonomy scales, as well as sociodemographic information. We will be recruiting Latina women ages 15-49 at the Mexican Consulate. We anticipate data collection the summer of 2021. We will use descriptive and multivariable statistics to describe our sample and test the association of acculturation and reproductive autonomy scores.

Results

The study results will be disseminated with the Consulate of Mexico and other local partners to inform them about the concepts of reproductive autonomy and acculturation, and to inform outreach efforts to the Latino(a) community.

Public Health Significance

Understanding whether there is a link between acculturation and reproductive autonomy in Oregon Latinas could help target education and reproductive health and related social services (such as interpersonal violence) services to those who need them most and help support Latinas to achieve their reproductive goals and enhance human rights.