Presenter Biography

Christopher Waterbury is a post-baccalaureate student and research assistant at Portland State University. His research interests include the use of voice in workplaces to promote diversity, equity, and inclusion.

Institution

PSU

Program/Major

Psychology

Degree

Post-baccalaureate

Presentation Type

Poster

Start Date

6-4-2022 2:51 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 2:57 PM

Persistent Identifier

https://orcid.org/0000-0001-8510-421X?lang=en

Keywords

service encounter; bias; stereotypes; discrimination; individuating information; age; Asian; experiments

Abstract

Minority stress theory links short- and long-term negative health outcomes to stigma and discrimination. It is important that workers have the agency to effect change in the processes of discrimination as a social determinate of health. Identity management strategies are elective tactics that workers may wish to use to reduce discrimination. Front line service workers may be discriminated against by customers in the form of negative customer service evaluations. Group-level stereotypes may influence customer service perceptions more than objective service quality. In this poster, we report findings from two studies in which we examined the effectiveness of an individual-level stigma remediation tactic in service encounters. Our findings suggest that performance perceptions are differentially impacted as a function of employee demographic stereotypes when individuals highlight the common dimensions of person perception of warmth and competence. We discuss the implications of our study along with possible future research on individual-level stigma remediation strategies.

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Apr 6th, 2:51 PM Apr 6th, 2:57 PM

Examination of an Individual-level Stigma Reduction Tactic in Front-line Service Encounters

Minority stress theory links short- and long-term negative health outcomes to stigma and discrimination. It is important that workers have the agency to effect change in the processes of discrimination as a social determinate of health. Identity management strategies are elective tactics that workers may wish to use to reduce discrimination. Front line service workers may be discriminated against by customers in the form of negative customer service evaluations. Group-level stereotypes may influence customer service perceptions more than objective service quality. In this poster, we report findings from two studies in which we examined the effectiveness of an individual-level stigma remediation tactic in service encounters. Our findings suggest that performance perceptions are differentially impacted as a function of employee demographic stereotypes when individuals highlight the common dimensions of person perception of warmth and competence. We discuss the implications of our study along with possible future research on individual-level stigma remediation strategies.