Title of Presentation

Changes in Blood Mineral Concentrations and ADHD Symptoms After 8 weeks of Micronutrient Supplementation

Presenter Information

Elizabeth S. WhiteFollow

Presenter Biography

Previous studies have discovered associations between nutritional status of children with ADHD and severity of ADHD symptoms. Data from the Micronutrients in ADHD Youth (MADDY) study was analyzed to assess the effectiveness of micronutrient supplementation for ADHD symptoms in children. The MADDY study is a randomized double-blinded three-center clinical trial. Data on the following seven minerals were assessed based on blood measurements from OHSU and OSU: lithium, selenium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium. All of these minerals were contained in the supplement given to subjects who received the active treatment and absent from the placebo supplement given to the control group. Linear regression clustered on site was used to assess both changes in blood mineral levels from baseline to week 8 between treatment groups and then between those who responded to treatment and those who did not among those who received the active treatment. Lithium and selenium were found to have increased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Inversely, copper decreased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Among, those that received the micronutrient supplement, those who responded to treatment had a greater decrease in copper and magnesium than those who did not respond to treatment.

Institution

OHSU

Program/Major

Biostatistics

Degree

MS

Presentation Type

Presentation

Start Date

6-4-2022 4:22 PM

End Date

6-4-2022 4:33 PM

Keywords

ADHD Naturopathy

Abstract

Previous studies have discovered associations between nutritional status of children with ADHD and severity of ADHD symptoms. Data from the Micronutrients in ADHD Youth (MADDY) study was analyzed to assess the effectiveness of micronutrient supplementation for ADHD symptoms in children. The MADDY study is a randomized double-blinded three-center clinical trial. Data on the following seven minerals were assessed based on blood measurements from OHSU and OSU: lithium, selenium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium. All of these minerals were contained in the supplement given to subjects who received the active treatment and absent from the placebo supplement given to the control group. Linear regression clustered on site was used to assess both changes in blood mineral levels from baseline to week 8 between treatment groups and then between those who responded to treatment and those who did not among those who received the active treatment. Lithium and selenium were found to have increased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Inversely, copper decreased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Among, those that received the micronutrient supplement, those who responded to treatment had a greater decrease in copper and magnesium than those who did not respond to treatment.

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Apr 6th, 4:22 PM Apr 6th, 4:33 PM

Changes in Blood Mineral Concentrations and ADHD Symptoms After 8 weeks of Micronutrient Supplementation

Previous studies have discovered associations between nutritional status of children with ADHD and severity of ADHD symptoms. Data from the Micronutrients in ADHD Youth (MADDY) study was analyzed to assess the effectiveness of micronutrient supplementation for ADHD symptoms in children. The MADDY study is a randomized double-blinded three-center clinical trial. Data on the following seven minerals were assessed based on blood measurements from OHSU and OSU: lithium, selenium, copper, zinc, iron, manganese, and magnesium. All of these minerals were contained in the supplement given to subjects who received the active treatment and absent from the placebo supplement given to the control group. Linear regression clustered on site was used to assess both changes in blood mineral levels from baseline to week 8 between treatment groups and then between those who responded to treatment and those who did not among those who received the active treatment. Lithium and selenium were found to have increased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Inversely, copper decreased significantly with supplementation as compared to those who received placebo. Among, those that received the micronutrient supplement, those who responded to treatment had a greater decrease in copper and magnesium than those who did not respond to treatment.