Start Date

20-5-2017 11:45 AM

End Date

20-5-2017 12:00 PM

Subjects

Geographic information systems -- Analysis, Geographic information systems -- Philosophy, Geographic information systems -- Social aspects

Description

Jim Thatcher is an Assistant Professor of Urban Studies at the University of Washington Tacoma. His research examines relationships between extremely large geospatial data sets and the creation and analysis of those data sets and society, with a focus on how data has come to mediate, saturate, and sustain modern urban environments. Often referred to as Critical Data Studies or Digital Political Ecologies, Jim’s work has been featured in media outlets including NPR and The Atlantic. His first edited volume, Thinking Big Data In Geography: New Regimes, New Research, is forthcoming from University of Nebraska Press.

Comments

Presentation slides are available at: https://jethatch.github.io/resistancegis/#/

Panel description:

The Trouble with Data: Issues in Production, Curation and Access

Panelists: Jamaal Green, Jim Thatcher, and Beth Pickard.

Moderator: Tim Hitchins

Data is more than just a spreadsheet with values. Its production, curation, and accessibility are rooted in power dynamics determined by those that control it. Because most data rests in the domain of government agencies and private corporations, its existence, or non-existence, benefits their interests most. This panel will explore some of the underlying problems with data, challenges with access, initiatives for protecting data from political interference, and resources that work to keep it free and openly available.

Note: Jamaal Green's presentation may be found here and Elizabeth Pickard's presentation may be found here

Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/21084

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May 20th, 11:45 AM May 20th, 12:00 PM

Resistance (?) GIS (?)

Jim Thatcher is an Assistant Professor of Urban Studies at the University of Washington Tacoma. His research examines relationships between extremely large geospatial data sets and the creation and analysis of those data sets and society, with a focus on how data has come to mediate, saturate, and sustain modern urban environments. Often referred to as Critical Data Studies or Digital Political Ecologies, Jim’s work has been featured in media outlets including NPR and The Atlantic. His first edited volume, Thinking Big Data In Geography: New Regimes, New Research, is forthcoming from University of Nebraska Press.