Location

Portland State University

Start Date

7-5-2019 11:00 AM

End Date

7-5-2019 1:00 PM

Abstract

In the realm of research and dermatology, the Fitzpatrick Skin Type scale (FST) has been the gold standard of measurement to classify sun sensitivity for human’s skin. This scale is based on an individual’s dermal reaction to ultraviolet exposure (Parrish, et al., 1974; Fitzpatrick, 1975; Pathak, et al., 1976; Fitzpatrick, 1988). It was assumed in science as well as popular culture that individuals with darker skin were less susceptible to issues related to UV damage of their skin. More recent research (Eilers, et al., 2013) suggests that while melanin affords some skin protection, damage can still occur that may result in disparities of darker skin individuals getting diagnosed with skin cancer later when the disease is more advanced and deadly. This phase of the Let’s Get Healthy! sun sensitivity project compares a revised selfadministered survey with objective reflectance photospectroscopy to determine if an individual’s melanin content correlates with FST. Validation of the self-administered survey will enable better characterization of individuals and guide tailored recommendations of sun protection behaviors that may reduce their risk of skin cancer.

Description

This project was supported by grants from the National Institutes of Health, including EXITO (5RL5GM118963-04 to C.J. Crespo), OCTRI (1UL1TR002369 to D. Ellison), SEPA (R25 OD010496 to L.K. Marriott).

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May 7th, 11:00 AM May 7th, 1:00 PM

Predictive Validity of a New Self-report Measure of Individual Skin Type Through Characterization of Skin Melanin Using Reflectance Photospectroscopy

Portland State University

In the realm of research and dermatology, the Fitzpatrick Skin Type scale (FST) has been the gold standard of measurement to classify sun sensitivity for human’s skin. This scale is based on an individual’s dermal reaction to ultraviolet exposure (Parrish, et al., 1974; Fitzpatrick, 1975; Pathak, et al., 1976; Fitzpatrick, 1988). It was assumed in science as well as popular culture that individuals with darker skin were less susceptible to issues related to UV damage of their skin. More recent research (Eilers, et al., 2013) suggests that while melanin affords some skin protection, damage can still occur that may result in disparities of darker skin individuals getting diagnosed with skin cancer later when the disease is more advanced and deadly. This phase of the Let’s Get Healthy! sun sensitivity project compares a revised selfadministered survey with objective reflectance photospectroscopy to determine if an individual’s melanin content correlates with FST. Validation of the self-administered survey will enable better characterization of individuals and guide tailored recommendations of sun protection behaviors that may reduce their risk of skin cancer.