Title of Poster / Presentation

Boredom and Risk-Taking in Mania

Presentation Type

Poster

Subjects

Manic-depressive illness -- Research, Mania, Boredom, Risk-taking (Psychology), Psychiatric rating scales

Department

Psychology

Advisor

Nicholas Smith

Student Level

Undergraduate

Abstract

The purpose of this proposal is to examine perceived boredom and risk-taking exhibited during manic episodes in atypical bipolar 1 disorder. I propose to recruit at least 100 participants, ages 18-25, from Intensive Outpatient Programs, Community Programs, and Inpatient Programs who will be verified to be in a manic episode and asymptomatic for psychosis by the on-site providers. A pilot study of two videos will be performed. Participants will be randomly assigned to view one of two videos: “calm” or “exciting”. They will respond to the Boredom Proneness Scale questionnaire at both pre- and post-test as well as the revised version of the Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale questionnaire at post-test. After suppressing boredom, an independent samples t test will be used to find a difference in mean, if any, in risk-taking among the two video group conditions. To support my hypotheses, I expect that those who view the exciting video will report lower overall boredom and score lower in risk-taking immediately following, compared to those who view the calm video. Please provide feedback here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1bftlyddDop5nklcQ7M6xSxFkzgDz4K3NQy23wJPTBw0/edit

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Boredom and Risk-Taking in Mania

The purpose of this proposal is to examine perceived boredom and risk-taking exhibited during manic episodes in atypical bipolar 1 disorder. I propose to recruit at least 100 participants, ages 18-25, from Intensive Outpatient Programs, Community Programs, and Inpatient Programs who will be verified to be in a manic episode and asymptomatic for psychosis by the on-site providers. A pilot study of two videos will be performed. Participants will be randomly assigned to view one of two videos: “calm” or “exciting”. They will respond to the Boredom Proneness Scale questionnaire at both pre- and post-test as well as the revised version of the Domain-Specific Risk-Taking Scale questionnaire at post-test. After suppressing boredom, an independent samples t test will be used to find a difference in mean, if any, in risk-taking among the two video group conditions. To support my hypotheses, I expect that those who view the exciting video will report lower overall boredom and score lower in risk-taking immediately following, compared to those who view the calm video. Please provide feedback here: https://docs.google.com/forms/d/1bftlyddDop5nklcQ7M6xSxFkzgDz4K3NQy23wJPTBw0/edit