Start Date

28-4-2015 9:00 AM

End Date

28-4-2015 10:15 AM

Disciplines

Ancient History, Greek and Roman through Late Antiquity | Women's History

Subjects

Empresses -- Rome, Livia Empress and consort of Augustus Emperor of Rome (approximately 58 B.C.-29 A.D), Rome -- History -- Augustus (30 B.C.-14 A.D)

Abstract

When one thinks of the ancient Roman heroes, Caesar and Augustus come to mind. We picture Roman men on the front lines in culture and society, while the women are kept back and oppressed. And while women definitely faced obstacles in ancient Rome, it didn't stop them from making an impact. This paper argues that Livia, wife of Roman emperor Augustus, was able to secretly manipulate politics in Rome as a mother and a wife, as seen in honorific statues, Ovid's poetry, and honorific titles.

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/15218

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Apr 28th, 9:00 AM Apr 28th, 10:15 AM

Livia's Power in Ancient Rome

When one thinks of the ancient Roman heroes, Caesar and Augustus come to mind. We picture Roman men on the front lines in culture and society, while the women are kept back and oppressed. And while women definitely faced obstacles in ancient Rome, it didn't stop them from making an impact. This paper argues that Livia, wife of Roman emperor Augustus, was able to secretly manipulate politics in Rome as a mother and a wife, as seen in honorific statues, Ovid's poetry, and honorific titles.