Start Date

28-4-2015 10:30 AM

End Date

28-4-2015 11:45 AM

Disciplines

European History | Political History | Social History

Subjects

Famines -- Ireland -- History -- 19th century, Great Britain -- Foreign economic relations -- Ireland, Ireland -- History -- Famine (1845-1852), Famines -- Political aspects

Abstract

The Irish Hunger of the mid nineteenth century began when a potato blight ruined most of Ireland's crop. While this was indeed a natural crisis, Britain's ineffective response exacerbated the sugaring the Irish endured. Widespread discrimination of the Irish, economic and moral ideologies all contributed to the British government's reaction to the famine. This paper evaluates how British adherence to these ideologies increased Irish suffering and aligns with the definition of genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention

Notes

Honorable Mention of the Karen E. Hoppes Young Historians Award for Outstanding Research and Writing.

Rights

© Copyright the author(s)

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Persistent Identifier

http://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/15223

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Apr 28th, 10:30 AM Apr 28th, 11:45 AM

The Irish Hunger and its Alignments with the 1948 Genocide Convention

The Irish Hunger of the mid nineteenth century began when a potato blight ruined most of Ireland's crop. While this was indeed a natural crisis, Britain's ineffective response exacerbated the sugaring the Irish endured. Widespread discrimination of the Irish, economic and moral ideologies all contributed to the British government's reaction to the famine. This paper evaluates how British adherence to these ideologies increased Irish suffering and aligns with the definition of genocide as defined by the 1948 Genocide Convention