Start Date

18-4-2018 10:30 AM

End Date

18-4-2018 11:45 AM

Disciplines

History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Subjects

Tuskegee Syphilis Study, Human experimentation in medicine -- Alabama -- Macon County -- History, Syphilis -- Research -- Alabama -- Macon County -- History, African American men -- Diseases -- Alabama -- Macon County -- History

Description

This research attempts to answer the question, "To what extent was race or racial bias a factor in the conception and execution of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male?" The goal is to reevaluate the degree to which the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) was driven by the racial bias in the face of modern counter-narratives. This has been done by examining events such as the Oslo Study and the Rosenwald Demonstration Project, organizations such as the Public Health Service and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and primary and secondary sources including interviews, a collection of newspapers and Congressional hearings, and several books. Upon examination of these, it becomes evident that the TSS was racist, but even if it wasn’t, its reception by the public was so strong that its semi-fictional influence in minority culture was more important than whether or not the people were personally racist.

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Apr 18th, 10:30 AM Apr 18th, 11:45 AM

The Pivotal Role that Race Plays in Medical Research: The Tuskegee Syphilis Study

This research attempts to answer the question, "To what extent was race or racial bias a factor in the conception and execution of the Tuskegee Study of Untreated Syphilis in the Negro Male?" The goal is to reevaluate the degree to which the Tuskegee Syphilis Study (TSS) was driven by the racial bias in the face of modern counter-narratives. This has been done by examining events such as the Oslo Study and the Rosenwald Demonstration Project, organizations such as the Public Health Service and Department of Health, Education, and Welfare, and primary and secondary sources including interviews, a collection of newspapers and Congressional hearings, and several books. Upon examination of these, it becomes evident that the TSS was racist, but even if it wasn’t, its reception by the public was so strong that its semi-fictional influence in minority culture was more important than whether or not the people were personally racist.