Start Date

1-5-2019 10:30 AM

End Date

1-5-2019 11:45 AM

Disciplines

African Languages and Societies | Political History | Race, Ethnicity and Post-Colonial Studies

Subjects

Katanga (Congo) -- History, Katanga (Congo) -- Social life and customs, Katanga (Congo) -- Ethnic relations -- Societies etc., Katanga (Congo) -- Politics and government

Description

The Katanga province in the Democratic Republic of Congo remains one of the most minerally rich regions in the world, leading to many political and social interferences by foreign powers hoping to secure a part of the wealth. Following decades of oppressive colonial rule, the Democratic Republic of Congo gained independence from Belgium in 1960, sparking a violent political shift and allowing a secessionist movement to take place in Katanga. While it is commonly held that foreign powers manipulated indigenous leaders in order to remain a powerful source within the community, this assertion is inaccurate. Although external powers undoubtedly shaped the secessionist movement, this paper explores the intentions of indigenous leaders and their manipulation of different entities in order to secure wealth and prestige in one of the world’s richest provinces.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/28565

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May 1st, 10:30 AM May 1st, 11:45 AM

Katanga Secession: The Growth and Manipulation of Ethnic Associations

The Katanga province in the Democratic Republic of Congo remains one of the most minerally rich regions in the world, leading to many political and social interferences by foreign powers hoping to secure a part of the wealth. Following decades of oppressive colonial rule, the Democratic Republic of Congo gained independence from Belgium in 1960, sparking a violent political shift and allowing a secessionist movement to take place in Katanga. While it is commonly held that foreign powers manipulated indigenous leaders in order to remain a powerful source within the community, this assertion is inaccurate. Although external powers undoubtedly shaped the secessionist movement, this paper explores the intentions of indigenous leaders and their manipulation of different entities in order to secure wealth and prestige in one of the world’s richest provinces.