Start Date

27-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2020 10:00 AM

Disciplines

History | Land Use Law | Urban Studies and Planning

Subjects

Municipal ordinances -- Oregon -- Lake Oswego, Iron industry and trade -- Oregon -- History, Lake Oswego (Or.) -- History, Waterways -- Oregon -- Law and legislation -- History

Description

The paper focuses on the interaction between Oregon's public trust doctrine, city ordinances, and private interests surrounding access to Oswego Lake. Areas of study include the early development of Lake Oswego with its prominence in the Oregon iron industry, and its transition from industrial town to weekend retreat to affluent suburb between the late 1800s and mid 1900s. The Lake Oswego Corporation has claimed power over all aspects of the lake, a notion disputed by Oregon's strong public trust doctrine. The city, whose duty is to all residents, has used the lake as a public asset while restricting access to the majority of residents. The thesis of the paper is that the Lake Oswego Corporation's culpability extends only to unlawful policing of a public waterway, as inexplicable city ordinances are what truly restrict the public's access.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/32900

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM Apr 27th, 10:00 AM

Pig Iron to Wrought Iron: Lake Oswego's Transformation from Iron Smelting to the Privatization of Oswego Lake

The paper focuses on the interaction between Oregon's public trust doctrine, city ordinances, and private interests surrounding access to Oswego Lake. Areas of study include the early development of Lake Oswego with its prominence in the Oregon iron industry, and its transition from industrial town to weekend retreat to affluent suburb between the late 1800s and mid 1900s. The Lake Oswego Corporation has claimed power over all aspects of the lake, a notion disputed by Oregon's strong public trust doctrine. The city, whose duty is to all residents, has used the lake as a public asset while restricting access to the majority of residents. The thesis of the paper is that the Lake Oswego Corporation's culpability extends only to unlawful policing of a public waterway, as inexplicable city ordinances are what truly restrict the public's access.