Start Date

27-4-2020 9:00 AM

End Date

27-4-2020 10:00 AM

Disciplines

History | Political Science | Sociology

Subjects

Spies -- United States -- History -- 18th century, United States -- History -- Revolution (1775-1783) -- Secret service, Military intelligence -- United States -- History -- 18th century, Benjamin Tallmadge (1754-1835)

Abstract

Prior to the American Revolutionary War (1775-1883), tensions rose as American colonial smugglers circumvented British taxes. By the onset of the conflict, Continental General George Washington faced a daunting British military invasion. Washington's strategy to outmaneuver and tire enemy forces necessitated a way to anticipate incoming attacks. Thus, he looked to espionage, but found few colonists with professional experience. So who would have the deceptive skills to fulfill the task? An exploration of Washington’s dilemma provides compelling evidence explaining how the colonial smugglers who started the war became the Patriot spies who ended it.

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Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/32895

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Apr 27th, 9:00 AM Apr 27th, 10:00 AM

The Spies that Founded America: How the War for Independence Revolutionized American Espionage

Prior to the American Revolutionary War (1775-1883), tensions rose as American colonial smugglers circumvented British taxes. By the onset of the conflict, Continental General George Washington faced a daunting British military invasion. Washington's strategy to outmaneuver and tire enemy forces necessitated a way to anticipate incoming attacks. Thus, he looked to espionage, but found few colonists with professional experience. So who would have the deceptive skills to fulfill the task? An exploration of Washington’s dilemma provides compelling evidence explaining how the colonial smugglers who started the war became the Patriot spies who ended it.