Start Date

19-5-2021 2:45 PM

End Date

19-5-2021 4:00 PM

Disciplines

History

Subjects

Japanese Americans -- Forced removal and internment (1942-1945), World War (1939-1945) -- Concentration camps -- United States, World War (1939-1945) -- Japanese Americans, United States. War Relocation Authority, Japanese Americans -- Social conditions

Abstract

Although the history of Executive Order 9066 and the subsequent Japanese-American internment is well known, the legal struggles against the internment process and the consequences of that displacement are often overlooked. In an attempt to end policies that were primarily motivated by racial prejudice, four first-generation Japanese Americans took it upon themselves to appeal four different cases to the Supreme Court. However, it was not until the decision of the last of the four Supreme Court cases, Ex Parte Endo, that Japanese Americans received even a sliver of justice for the discrimination they had faced. Having lost their work, homes, communities, personal liberties, and human rights as they were rounded up like cattle and interned, Japanese Americans sought to find a way to cope with the trauma they endured. Having become perpetual foreigners in their own country, in their best efforts to assimilate into the mainstream, they almost completely abandoned their previous lives and cultural identities, becoming as American as possible. This paper examines how internment and four Supreme Court cases, Yasui v. United States, Hirabayashi v. United States, Korematsu v. United States, and Ex Parte Endo, shaped Japanese Americans’ trauma, identities, and their ability to survive.

Rights

© Copyright the author(s)

IN COPYRIGHT:
http://rightsstatements.org/vocab/InC/1.0/
This Item is protected by copyright and/or related rights. You are free to use this Item in any way that is permitted by the copyright and related rights legislation that applies to your use. For other uses you need to obtain permission from the rights-holder(s).

DISCLAIMER:
The purpose of this statement is to help the public understand how this Item may be used. When there is a (non-standard) License or contract that governs re-use of the associated Item, this statement only summarizes the effects of some of its terms. It is not a License, and should not be used to license your Work. To license your own Work, use a License offered at https://creativecommons.org/

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35812

Included in

History Commons

Share

COinS
 
May 19th, 2:45 PM May 19th, 4:00 PM

Session 2: Panel 3: Presenter 4 (Paper) -- Internment: The Legal Challenges and Effects of Displacement on Japanese Americans

Although the history of Executive Order 9066 and the subsequent Japanese-American internment is well known, the legal struggles against the internment process and the consequences of that displacement are often overlooked. In an attempt to end policies that were primarily motivated by racial prejudice, four first-generation Japanese Americans took it upon themselves to appeal four different cases to the Supreme Court. However, it was not until the decision of the last of the four Supreme Court cases, Ex Parte Endo, that Japanese Americans received even a sliver of justice for the discrimination they had faced. Having lost their work, homes, communities, personal liberties, and human rights as they were rounded up like cattle and interned, Japanese Americans sought to find a way to cope with the trauma they endured. Having become perpetual foreigners in their own country, in their best efforts to assimilate into the mainstream, they almost completely abandoned their previous lives and cultural identities, becoming as American as possible. This paper examines how internment and four Supreme Court cases, Yasui v. United States, Hirabayashi v. United States, Korematsu v. United States, and Ex Parte Endo, shaped Japanese Americans’ trauma, identities, and their ability to survive.