Start Date

25-4-2022 9:00 AM

End Date

25-4-2022 12:00 PM

Disciplines

European History | History | History of Science, Technology, and Medicine

Subjects

Nicholas II -- Emperor of Russia (1868-1918) -- Family, Russia -- History -- Nicholas II (1894-1917), Grigoriĭ Efimovich Rasputin (1869-1916), Hemophilia

Abstract

Monarchies have often defined the flow of history. Their decisions and ideas affect whole countries, which can lead to a crisis if the ruler is unable to lead effectively. A lack of leadership can bring about war, famine, political instability, and political unrest, all of which occurred in Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries. The poor decision-making of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra brought about civic unrest that eventually led to their downfall. In addition to the unstable country, the Imperial family was also struggling with the state of their only heir, who had inherited the genetic disorder hemophilia. This paper seeks to explore the connection of the Tsar’s political decisions to the chronic illness of his son Alexei and how it impacted the Russian Revolution and beyond.

Rights

© 2022 Tessia A. Hoffman

Creative Commons License

Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 4.0 License
This work is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-Share Alike 4.0 License.

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/37554

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Apr 25th, 9:00 AM Apr 25th, 12:00 PM

Bad Blood: Hemophilia and It’s Detriment to the Russian Imperial Family

Monarchies have often defined the flow of history. Their decisions and ideas affect whole countries, which can lead to a crisis if the ruler is unable to lead effectively. A lack of leadership can bring about war, famine, political instability, and political unrest, all of which occurred in Russia during the 19th and 20th centuries. The poor decision-making of Tsar Nicholas II and Tsarina Alexandra brought about civic unrest that eventually led to their downfall. In addition to the unstable country, the Imperial family was also struggling with the state of their only heir, who had inherited the genetic disorder hemophilia. This paper seeks to explore the connection of the Tsar’s political decisions to the chronic illness of his son Alexei and how it impacted the Russian Revolution and beyond.