Presentation Title

Mapping Risks Across Urban-Wildlife Connectivity

Start Date

February 2018

End Date

February 2018

Abstract

Habitat connectivity enables wildlife to access resources for their survival in and around an urban landscape. The question of connectivity becomes especially important as urban growth and development continue across Portland. Undeveloped areas within the city are expected to be most at risk. Vacant lots and private property are more likely to be developed than publicly owned spaces (i.e. parks) within the urban growth boundary. Site-specific effects of development vary across multiple scales and for many species. Wildlife moving within areas of concern will benefit from the connectivity of available habitat. The objective of this work is to map locations at high risk of development within and surrounding the city, and to assess the effects of these risks using statistical clustering Getis-Ord Gi* 1) inside the urban growth boundary (UGB) 2) within carefully selected connectivity zones at pilot sites and 3) at currently undeveloped areas. Land ownership, vegetation characteristics, and aerial photography will be used to identify hot spots with GIS analysis. A high risk area of development map would influence the site selection process for land managers and the public to identify areas of concern, and the needs of wildlife. The resulting maps can be overlaid with habitat quality and permeability assessment scoring for future research initiatives.This research will assist managers and partners to protect the values associated with urban wildlife habitat.

Subjects

GIS / modeling, Habitat assessment, Land use planning

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/25643

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Feb 5th, 4:00 PM Feb 5th, 6:00 PM

Mapping Risks Across Urban-Wildlife Connectivity

Habitat connectivity enables wildlife to access resources for their survival in and around an urban landscape. The question of connectivity becomes especially important as urban growth and development continue across Portland. Undeveloped areas within the city are expected to be most at risk. Vacant lots and private property are more likely to be developed than publicly owned spaces (i.e. parks) within the urban growth boundary. Site-specific effects of development vary across multiple scales and for many species. Wildlife moving within areas of concern will benefit from the connectivity of available habitat. The objective of this work is to map locations at high risk of development within and surrounding the city, and to assess the effects of these risks using statistical clustering Getis-Ord Gi* 1) inside the urban growth boundary (UGB) 2) within carefully selected connectivity zones at pilot sites and 3) at currently undeveloped areas. Land ownership, vegetation characteristics, and aerial photography will be used to identify hot spots with GIS analysis. A high risk area of development map would influence the site selection process for land managers and the public to identify areas of concern, and the needs of wildlife. The resulting maps can be overlaid with habitat quality and permeability assessment scoring for future research initiatives.This research will assist managers and partners to protect the values associated with urban wildlife habitat.