Presentation Title

An Investigation of Wapato Along the Lower Columbia River

Start Date

February 2018

End Date

February 2018

Abstract

Sagittaria latifolia is a northwest native aquatic perennial known commonly by its Chinook Jargon name ‘wapato.’ S. latifolia has long held cultural significance for the role of its edible underground tubers as an essential food source and trade commodity to early indigenous tribes located along the Lower Columbia River. With its ability to readily absorb heavy metals from soil, S. latifolia is also a valuable indicator of wetland conditions. The compilation of known wapato-patch locations along a 40 mile stretch of the Lower Columbia River was the focus of this project. Additionally, samples of wapato tubers and their surrounding substrates were taken from three separate locations along this stretch and analyzed for the presence of heavy metals. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary data for future investigations of S. latifolia and wetland conditions in the Columbia River Basin.

Presentation Option

Yes

Subjects

Land/watershed management, Plant ecology, Water quality, GIS / modeling

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Feb 5th, 4:00 PM Feb 5th, 6:00 PM

An Investigation of Wapato Along the Lower Columbia River

Sagittaria latifolia is a northwest native aquatic perennial known commonly by its Chinook Jargon name ‘wapato.’ S. latifolia has long held cultural significance for the role of its edible underground tubers as an essential food source and trade commodity to early indigenous tribes located along the Lower Columbia River. With its ability to readily absorb heavy metals from soil, S. latifolia is also a valuable indicator of wetland conditions. The compilation of known wapato-patch locations along a 40 mile stretch of the Lower Columbia River was the focus of this project. Additionally, samples of wapato tubers and their surrounding substrates were taken from three separate locations along this stretch and analyzed for the presence of heavy metals. The purpose of this study is to provide preliminary data for future investigations of S. latifolia and wetland conditions in the Columbia River Basin.