Start Date

11-2-2019 11:30 AM

End Date

11-2-2019 11:40 AM

Abstract

The West Willamette Restoration Partnership is working to enhance connected natural areas, on both public and private property, in SW Portland to increase functionality as a wildlife corridor with connections to Forest Park to the north and Tryon Creek State Natural Area to the south. To manage the invasive vegetation currently found within strategically selected restoration sites in the Westside Wildlife Corridor, a variety of treatments were conducted and monitored between 2016-2018. Ground ivy (Hedera sp.), canopy weeds (including Clematis vitalba, Hedera sp.), and weedy tree treatments were conducted. Treatments included manual pulling, herbicide treatments, and plantings of native trees and shrubs. Changes in plant species composition and coverage was assessed using the Unified Monitoring Protocol and photo-point monitoring. The current results show promising signs that both long-term community stewardship efforts and short-term high intensity treatments are having the intended effect of decreasing ivy cover and having positive effects on native species diversity. Photo-points of sites of ground ivy and canopy ivy treatments showed noticeable effects: less and dying ivy and new non-invasive plants establishing. More work, and continued maintenance, will be necessary to fully restore these sites to a native plant-dominated condition. The project also utilizes a variety of tools to engage with the public about enhancement efforts.

Subjects

Habitat assessment, Habitat restoration

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Feb 11th, 11:30 AM Feb 11th, 11:40 AM

Documenting change in an urban forest restoration project

The West Willamette Restoration Partnership is working to enhance connected natural areas, on both public and private property, in SW Portland to increase functionality as a wildlife corridor with connections to Forest Park to the north and Tryon Creek State Natural Area to the south. To manage the invasive vegetation currently found within strategically selected restoration sites in the Westside Wildlife Corridor, a variety of treatments were conducted and monitored between 2016-2018. Ground ivy (Hedera sp.), canopy weeds (including Clematis vitalba, Hedera sp.), and weedy tree treatments were conducted. Treatments included manual pulling, herbicide treatments, and plantings of native trees and shrubs. Changes in plant species composition and coverage was assessed using the Unified Monitoring Protocol and photo-point monitoring. The current results show promising signs that both long-term community stewardship efforts and short-term high intensity treatments are having the intended effect of decreasing ivy cover and having positive effects on native species diversity. Photo-points of sites of ground ivy and canopy ivy treatments showed noticeable effects: less and dying ivy and new non-invasive plants establishing. More work, and continued maintenance, will be necessary to fully restore these sites to a native plant-dominated condition. The project also utilizes a variety of tools to engage with the public about enhancement efforts.