Presentation Title

Categorizing bird species based off response to Pleistocene climate variation

Abstract

This paper analyzes how extant bird species that have Pleistocene California fossil records will respond to climate variation in future. Predictions are made on their response to habitat change and variation in the future by assessing the changes in relative abundance of species in Pleistocene California over time, as well as comparing these Pleistocene distributions to current distributions derived from eBird, Breeding Bird Survey, iNaturalist, and other data sources, The analysis determines if species are unable to shift their distributions and are likely to experience decline, or shift their distributions according to habitat and climate change, or do not need to shift their distributions, but are rather successful in a variety of habitats. This population-level behavior is then used to predict distribution changes in response to anthropogenic climate change, based on models of habitat change over the next several decades.

Subjects

Animal ecology, Climate Change, GIS / modeling

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33814

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Categorizing bird species based off response to Pleistocene climate variation

This paper analyzes how extant bird species that have Pleistocene California fossil records will respond to climate variation in future. Predictions are made on their response to habitat change and variation in the future by assessing the changes in relative abundance of species in Pleistocene California over time, as well as comparing these Pleistocene distributions to current distributions derived from eBird, Breeding Bird Survey, iNaturalist, and other data sources, The analysis determines if species are unable to shift their distributions and are likely to experience decline, or shift their distributions according to habitat and climate change, or do not need to shift their distributions, but are rather successful in a variety of habitats. This population-level behavior is then used to predict distribution changes in response to anthropogenic climate change, based on models of habitat change over the next several decades.