Presentation Title

Soil Characteristics in Relation to Urban Tree Mortality

Abstract

Research in 1993, 2003, and 2013 showed high rates of tree mortality and low rates of recruitment (new trees) in Portland, Oregon’s Forest Park. Three control sites in the Mount Hood National Forest were added in 2013; research from 2018 showed the control sites had significantly more live trees, and more seedlings and saplings than the urban sites. For the last three summers, we have been studying the soil at our sites to elucidate possible causes for the observed low rates of recruitment. Data from 2017, 2018, and 2019 have shown the control sites have significantly deeper O horizons, higher rates of soil respiration, and lower levels of electroconductivity (EC) than the urban sites. We believe changes to the soil may be related to the lack of recruitment in urban forests.

Subjects

Plant ecology, Soil science

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33825

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Soil Characteristics in Relation to Urban Tree Mortality

Research in 1993, 2003, and 2013 showed high rates of tree mortality and low rates of recruitment (new trees) in Portland, Oregon’s Forest Park. Three control sites in the Mount Hood National Forest were added in 2013; research from 2018 showed the control sites had significantly more live trees, and more seedlings and saplings than the urban sites. For the last three summers, we have been studying the soil at our sites to elucidate possible causes for the observed low rates of recruitment. Data from 2017, 2018, and 2019 have shown the control sites have significantly deeper O horizons, higher rates of soil respiration, and lower levels of electroconductivity (EC) than the urban sites. We believe changes to the soil may be related to the lack of recruitment in urban forests.