Presentation Title

From Source Assessment to Water Quality Success: Implementing TMDL Alternatives in Southwest Washington

Presenter(s) Information

Devan RostorferFollow

Start Date

2-3-2020 3:00 PM

End Date

2-3-2020 3:10 PM

Abstract

The East Fork Lewis River (EFLR) watershed is home to both the fastest growing city in Washington State, and five priority populations of ESA listed salmon and steelhead. The watershed has seen a 47 percent increase in population since 2000, and provides recreation, timber, agriculture, and water resources for this rapidly growing region. The diversity of functions the watershed supports makes it a central focus of salmon recovery, water quality, and water quantity management SW Washington.

Currently, the EFLR is on Washington’s polluted waters list for warm water temperatures and bacteria problems. In 2018, the EFLR Watershed Bacteria and Temperature Source Assessment was published to support water cleanup efforts. To develop and implement the plan, the EFLR Partnership was launched to collaborate with local, state, federal, and tribal governments, non-profits, watershed groups, and landowners. Over 50 partners from 30 organizations have engaged in Partnership activities.

Today, there are multiple new projects and programs being developed and implemented in the watershed. Priorities for long-term implementation include addressing threats from septic systems, stormwater, and agriculture, and increasing riparian restoration in the watershed.

This presentation highlights how:

• Ecology developed a Source Assessment and Water Cleanup Plan for the watershed.

• Ecology is implementing proactive nonpoint source investigation to find and fix sources of bacteria.

•Partners have developed a new pollution identification and correction program to comprehensively address failing septic systems and agricultural challenges in the watershed.

This session will end with commentary on next steps for water quality collaboration in Clark County.

Subjects

Environmental education, Land/watershed management, Water quality

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33842

This document is currently not available here.

Share

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 3:00 PM Mar 2nd, 3:10 PM

From Source Assessment to Water Quality Success: Implementing TMDL Alternatives in Southwest Washington

The East Fork Lewis River (EFLR) watershed is home to both the fastest growing city in Washington State, and five priority populations of ESA listed salmon and steelhead. The watershed has seen a 47 percent increase in population since 2000, and provides recreation, timber, agriculture, and water resources for this rapidly growing region. The diversity of functions the watershed supports makes it a central focus of salmon recovery, water quality, and water quantity management SW Washington.

Currently, the EFLR is on Washington’s polluted waters list for warm water temperatures and bacteria problems. In 2018, the EFLR Watershed Bacteria and Temperature Source Assessment was published to support water cleanup efforts. To develop and implement the plan, the EFLR Partnership was launched to collaborate with local, state, federal, and tribal governments, non-profits, watershed groups, and landowners. Over 50 partners from 30 organizations have engaged in Partnership activities.

Today, there are multiple new projects and programs being developed and implemented in the watershed. Priorities for long-term implementation include addressing threats from septic systems, stormwater, and agriculture, and increasing riparian restoration in the watershed.

This presentation highlights how:

• Ecology developed a Source Assessment and Water Cleanup Plan for the watershed.

• Ecology is implementing proactive nonpoint source investigation to find and fix sources of bacteria.

•Partners have developed a new pollution identification and correction program to comprehensively address failing septic systems and agricultural challenges in the watershed.

This session will end with commentary on next steps for water quality collaboration in Clark County.