Presentation Title

The Landscape Services of Ecology

Start Date

2-3-2020 11:10 AM

End Date

2-3-2020 11:20 AM

Abstract

Connectivity is critical to maintaining ecological functions and benefits in human-modified landscapes, including urban areas. However, the literature on this topic has been limited by inconsistent terminology and methods, and largely omits human access to nature and its benefits as a form of connectivity. We build upon previous theory to present four distinct but interrelated categories of connectivity (habitat, geophysical, eco-social, and landscape) and use the Ecosystem Services framework to review the socio-ecological benefits which depend on them. There are also many overlaps, conflicts, and synergies among connectivity categories and their associated services and disservices. Identifying the services which arise from these four categories of connectivity, and how they interact, can help to maximize the benefits of connectivity, improve understanding of complex socio-ecological systems across disciplines, and develop more holistic decision-making processes.

***NOTE*** This presentation should precede Carole Hardy et al., "A framework for incorporating ecosystem connectivity into urban planning for livable cities". We would also like these two topics to be considered for a lunchtime breakout discussion.

Subjects

Economics, Land use planning, Land/watershed management

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/33850

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Mar 2nd, 11:10 AM Mar 2nd, 11:20 AM

The Landscape Services of Ecology

Connectivity is critical to maintaining ecological functions and benefits in human-modified landscapes, including urban areas. However, the literature on this topic has been limited by inconsistent terminology and methods, and largely omits human access to nature and its benefits as a form of connectivity. We build upon previous theory to present four distinct but interrelated categories of connectivity (habitat, geophysical, eco-social, and landscape) and use the Ecosystem Services framework to review the socio-ecological benefits which depend on them. There are also many overlaps, conflicts, and synergies among connectivity categories and their associated services and disservices. Identifying the services which arise from these four categories of connectivity, and how they interact, can help to maximize the benefits of connectivity, improve understanding of complex socio-ecological systems across disciplines, and develop more holistic decision-making processes.

***NOTE*** This presentation should precede Carole Hardy et al., "A framework for incorporating ecosystem connectivity into urban planning for livable cities". We would also like these two topics to be considered for a lunchtime breakout discussion.