Start Date

2-3-2021 10:20 AM

End Date

2-3-2021 11:25 AM

Abstract

Johnson Creek flows 26 miles from Boring, through Damascus, Gresham, Southeast Portland and ultimately to its confluence with the Willamette River in Milwaukie. Like many streams with a significant urban watershed component, Johnson Creek and its resident anadromous fish population are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. For the past 11 years, Johnson Creek Watershed Council has focused its riparian restoration on taxlots most in need of shade, identified with a Heat Source model. For the past five years, the Council has removed, repaired, or retrofitted six fish passage barriers, focusing its efforts on opening up habitat in tributaries that have high natural cold water potential. Extensive stream temperature monitoring, combined with environmental DNA testing, provide preliminary clues to the benefits of this strategy.

Subjects

Climate Change, Fisheries, Land/watershed management

Persistent Identifier

https://archives.pdx.edu/ds/psu/35480

Share

COinS
 
Mar 2nd, 10:20 AM Mar 2nd, 11:25 AM

JCWC's Cold Water Restoration Strategy

Johnson Creek flows 26 miles from Boring, through Damascus, Gresham, Southeast Portland and ultimately to its confluence with the Willamette River in Milwaukie. Like many streams with a significant urban watershed component, Johnson Creek and its resident anadromous fish population are vulnerable to the impacts of climate change. For the past 11 years, Johnson Creek Watershed Council has focused its riparian restoration on taxlots most in need of shade, identified with a Heat Source model. For the past five years, the Council has removed, repaired, or retrofitted six fish passage barriers, focusing its efforts on opening up habitat in tributaries that have high natural cold water potential. Extensive stream temperature monitoring, combined with environmental DNA testing, provide preliminary clues to the benefits of this strategy.